18 Panel Drug Tests: What Drugs Show Up?

The number of panels in drug testing programs indicates the number of drugs checked. This means that 18 Panel drug tests will look for 18 different drugs. A ten-panel drug test will look for ten different drugs.

What are 18 Panel Drug Tests?

18 panel drug tests are one of the most comprehensive drug screens today. Instead of detecting a limited number of illicit substances, these drug tests look for 18 different drugs in one go. The results are also simple to read and do not require you to open the cup of urine, making it more convenient and sanitary.

These tests also include built-in temperature strips to ensure that the urine sample is at the proper temperature for bodily fluids. This way, nobody can tamper a test with synthetic urine or any other fraudulent substance.

These tests are also leak-proof and have non-drip screw tops. Because drug detection tools such as the 18 Panel test are in high demand, purchasing drug tests in bulk is also an option. This way, customers can obtain the most product at the best price.

The question is – what illicit substances show up in 18 panel drug tests? Read on to find out.

18 Panel Drug Tests: Which Illegal Substances Can They Detect?

1. Amphetamine (AMP)

Amphetamine is a widely used illegal drug that overstimulates the central nervous system, causing users to feel unusually alert, energetic, and productive. Stimulants such as amphetamine and methamphetamine can also cause euphoria, agitation, delusions, and hallucinations. Abusing these drugs can also lead to serious health issues like stroke, heart disease, convulsions, and severe tooth decay.

2. Opiates (OPI)

Opiates are controlled prescription substances derived from Opium, a chemical found naturally in poppy seeds and plants. Doctors prescribe these for treating mild to severe pain in patients. Opioids have extremely high rates of abuse due to their intensely calming effects, leading to addiction in many cases.

3. Methamphetamine (MET)

This stimulant affects the central nervous system. Meth is a white, odorless, bitter-tasting crystalline powder that dissolves easily in water or alcohol. The US Drug Enforcement Administration has classified it as a Schedule II stimulant, making it legally available only through a nonrefillable prescription. It is medically indicated for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and as a short-term component of weight-loss treatments, but these uses are limited. Doctors rarely prescribe it. But when they do, the recommended doses are far lower than those commonly misused and abused.

4. BZO (Benzodiazepine)

Benzodiazepines affect the central nervous system, causing sedation and muscle relaxation and lowering anxiety levels. Unfortunately, they have also been used as a “date rape” drug because they can significantly impair, if not eliminate, functions that normally allow a person to resist or even want to resist sexual aggression or assault.

5. COC (Cocaine)

Cocaine is a highly addictive stimulant. Therefore, this Schedule II drug has a high abuse potential, but doctors can prescribe it for legitimate medical purposes.

6. MTD (Methadone)

Methadone alters how your brain and nervous system respond to pain, causing you to feel better. It acts slower than other strong analgesics such as morphine. If you are in a lot of pain due to an injury, surgery, or a long-term illness, your doctor may prescribe methadone. It also prevents the high caused by codeine, heroin, hydrocodone, morphine, and oxycodone. In replacement therapy, it can provide a similar sensation while preventing withdrawal symptoms and cravings.

7. OXY (Oxycodone)

Oxycodone is a semisynthetic but moderately potent, orally available opioid. It is widely used for acute or chronic pain management, either alone or with acetaminophen. However, combining oxycodone and acetaminophen has been linked to numerous cases of acute liver failure caused by an unintentional overdose.

8. BUP (Buprenorphine)

Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) programs use Buprenorphine to help people reduce or quit using heroin or other opiates, such as pain relievers like morphine. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved it for clinical use in October 2002 for the recent advancement in medication-assisted treatment (MAT). Medications such as buprenorphine, when combined with counseling and behavioral therapies, offer a comprehensive approach to treating opioid addiction. Buprenorphine is both safe and effective when taken as prescribed.

9. MDMA (Ecstasy)

MDMA is an illegal drug that acts as a stimulant and a psychedelic, which makes a person feel energized but at the same time distorts his perception of time and enhanced enjoyment from tactile experiences. It goes by the street names Ecstasy and Molly. Its primary effects in the brain are on neurons that communicate with other neurons via the chemicals serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine.

10. THC (Tetrahydrocannabinol)

THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol, is the chemical in marijuana that causes most of its psychological effects. It functions similarly to the cannabinoid chemicals produced naturally by the body.
THC causes euphoria by stimulating brain cells to release dopamine. However, it also interferes in processing information in the hippocampus, the part of the brain responsible for memory formation.

11. BAR (Barbiturate)

Barbiturates are a class of sedative-hypnotics, broadly describing their sleep-inducing and anxiety-reducing effects.Barbiturates are extremely dangerous because it is difficult to predict the correct dose. Even a minor overdose can result in a coma or death. Barbiturates are also addictive and can result in a potentially fatal withdrawal syndrome.

12. PCP (Phencyclidine)

PCP belongs to the hallucinogen drug class. These hallucinogens distort the things that you see, hear, or feel while awake. Events seem real but turn out to be figments of the imagination. PCP users can become psychologically addicted to it. This indicates that their mind is dependent on PCP. They cannot control their use, and they rely on PCP to function in daily life.

13. FYL (Fentanyl)

Fentanyl is a highly potent synthetic opioid similar to morphine but 50 to 100 times stronger. This prescription drug is also illegally manufactured and used. It is a pain reliever that, like morphine, is commonly used to treat patients in excruciating pain, particularly after surgery. It is also used to treat chronic pain patients who are physically tolerant to other opioids. Fentanyl is one of the most commonly used drugs in overdose deaths in the United States.

14. EtG (Alcohol)

EtG or ethyl glucuronide is a byproduct of ethanol (drinkable alcohol) and glucuronide. Urine drug tests with EtG can detect this metabolite in urine much longer than alcohol tests that use saliva or blood. EtG is detectable in urine for up to 48 hours after a few drinks and sometimes for up to 72 hours or longer if the drinking is heavy.

15. KRA (Kratom)

Kratom is a botanical substance derived from the plant Mitragyna speciosa, a native to Thailand and other Southeast Asian countries. It may cause a “high” or a rush of euphoria similar to the effects of opioid abuse.

16. TCA (Tricyclic antidepressants)

Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are a type of antidepressant medication with a similar chemical structure and biological effects to other antidepressants. Scientists believe that patients suffering from depression may have an imbalance in neurotransmitters, chemicals produced by nerves and used to communicate with other nerves. These substances increase norepinephrine and serotonin levels while blocking the action of acetylcholine, another neurotransmitter. Additionally, TCA can relieve depression, cause sedation and partially block the effects of histamine.


How To Use An 18-Panel Cup

17. LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide)

LSD is one of the most powerful behavior-altering chemicals. It comes from lysergic acid, which is found in the ergot fungus that grows on rye and other grains. This colorless and odorless drug is manufactured in crystal form in illegal laboratories, primarily in the United States. Distributors convert these crystals into liquid form. 18 panel drug tests can detect this substance.

18. HCO (Hydroxychloroquine)

The antimalarial drug hydroxychloroquine prevents or treats malaria caused by mosquito bites. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of the United States provides updated guidelines and travel recommendations for malaria prevention and treatment in various parts of the world. It was considered as a treatment for COVID-19, but authorities halted it due to the potential risks.

These are the substances that 18 panel drug tests can detect. If you need 99% accurate, CLIA-waived, FDA-approved drug test cups, strips, or oral swabs, visit the Ovus Medical Store. We have a wide collection you can choose from.

 

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What Does a Positive COVID-19 Antigen Rapid Test Result Mean?

CDC reported 705,264 new COVID-19 cases on January 5, 2022. They estimate 95% of these are the Omicron variant. And an antigen rapid test is the fastest way to know your status.

But you might wonder what to do if you test positive for COVID-19. What’s the difference between a PCR and antigen COVID-19 test? And for how long can you stay positive?

We have a guide that shines a light on antigen tests, positive results, and PCR tests. So you can get on with what’s important to you.

Keep reading to learn all you need to know.

What Is an Antigen Rapid Test for COVID-19?

Antigen rapid tests excel in any setting where speed is key. They detect virus proteins in a sample and give results in less than 30 minutes. They use a lateral flow cassette, like a pregnancy test, a swab, and an extraction fluid.

You can use them to check your COVID-19 status. They can help if you came into contact with someone infected, have symptoms, or want a fast COVID-19 home test.

How Do Antigen Tests Work?

You swab your nose and throat, place the swab in the extraction solution, and drop it onto the test cassette. Then you wait for the result.

Most kits come with a pipette-style tube to drip the sample onto the test. Results show in 5 to 30 minutes. A single line on the control line (C) shows the test has worked. If there is no line on C, the test is void.

The test line (T) shows the test result. A line on C but no line on T means the test is a valid negative. A line on T shows a positive result: The test detected COVID-19 proteins.

Benefits of Antigen Tests

The speed of results makes antigen rapid tests ideal for daily use. Many businesses use them to test employees in transport, education, and healthcare.

They are cheap to buy, give fast results, and you can do them without training. Most kits come with instructions. And you can find videos online.

Limits of Antigen Tests

Home testing means users can void tests by contaminating them by accident. Traces of food, drink, and dirt can affect the result.

False positives can lead to unneeded isolation. False negatives can put your community in danger. But if you take care, you can avoid flawed results.

What Is a PCR Test for COVID-19?

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) tests are the most accurate detection technique for COVID-19. They are more in-depth than antigen rapid tests. And we use them to confirm positive results with a more detailed analysis.

How Do PCR Tests Work?

We take samples the same way as antigen rapid tests. You order your test. Swab your nose and throat. Place your swab into a tube with an extraction solution. Package it. Then send it to the laboratory

The lab then copies or amplifies the sample to see if it contains COVID-19 genetic material or RNA. If they detect RNA, they change it into DNA for analysis. We call this process reverse transcription.

Benefits of PCR Tests

They give detailed results. They are conclusive. And because they need professional analysis, they are less prone to errors. But not perfect.

False negatives and positives happen. And false negatives are most common. This is why home testing with antigen rapid tests is important.

Limits of PCR Tests

They take a long time to give results. You need to order a test and send it to the lab. Once your result is ready, you will get an email or text. But these labs are busy, and you might wait a few days. Rapid antigen tests take minutes.

Can Antigen or PCR Tests Identify Covid Variants?

No, antigen rapid tests and PCR tests detect COVID-19 infection. But they can’t tell you which variant you have.

For this, we need a genome sequencing study. Best to leave it to the universities, biochemists, and microbiologists. Besides, your isolation period remains the same.

What Is the Difference Between COVID-19 Antibody Tests and PCR Tests?

Antibody tests, or serology tests, use blood samples to detect COVID-19 antibodies. If you’ve had COVID-19 before or had the vaccines, you should have antibodies.

As we said, PCR tests detect COVID-19’s RNA. They tell you if you have the virus, but cannot tell you whether you’ve had it before.

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What to Do If You Test Positive for COVID-19?

Stay calm and follow government guidance. If you’re vaccinated, you should dodge the worst effects. But you should take steps to protect others.

Isolate

CDC guidance states you should stay at home for 5 full days if you test positive. Day 0 is when your symptoms started or when you tested positive. Do a test on day 5. If you are negative and feel well on day 6, you can go out.

You should wear a mask around others for a further 5 days and limit social contact during this period. This is to protect others.

Inform Your Close Contacts

Contact tracing lets others know they have been in contact with someone with COVID-19. They may be negative, but knowing about it can help prevent community transmission. Your colleagues deserve to know too.

You can use COVID-19 exposure apps. Or you can contact people by phone. Either way, letting your contacts know is the best thing to do.

Track Your Symptoms and Test at Intervals

Take your temperature and pay attention to other symptoms. These could include a dry cough, tight chest, headache, body aches, and a runny nose. This can depend on the variant. You might lose your sense of taste or smell too.

Take an antigen rapid test every other day if you have enough. But if you run low, save some for the end of your isolation. Until Day 6, you must stay in isolation even if you test negative.

Can an Employer Ask for Proof of a Positive COVID-19 Test?

In short, yes. There are acts of government that protect your health data. But as COVID-19 classes as a national emergency, it can override sections of those acts.

COVID-19 testing in work has become as common as drug testing. And due to the pandemic, most bosses have the right to request it.

The HIPAA Does Not Apply to COVID-19

The 1996 Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) protects your health data. But it does not stop your employer from asking you about COVID-19 or any symptoms.

They can use this information for contact tracing. But they cannot disclose your identity to those with which you had contact.

The ADA Classes COVID-19 as a Direct Threat

The 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) keeps your health data private. And it exempts you from certain health screenings. But there are exceptions.

COVID-19 meets the ADA criteria for a direct threat. Your employer can ask for data related to COVID-19. The purpose of ADA is to prevent disability-related discrimination. It does not cover COVID-19 inquiries.

Sick Pay and False Claims

Employers have the right to screen employees who enter the workplace. Consider this when you return. They must keep this data confidential. If you self-report your result from home, the same rules apply.

Submitting a false COVID-19 positive test to claim sick pay could constitute fraud. And in most cases, symptoms alone are enough to claim sick leave. Check your contract for your company’s sick pay guidelines.

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How Long Can You Test Positive for Covid-19?

OK, so you’ve got it. How long will it take to get rid of it?

Most people test negative around day 5 or 7. But some people test positive for longer. This is due to viral load. The best way to know is by taking antigen rapid tests.

Viral Load and What It Means?

Viral load is how much of the virus we have in our bodies. After the incubation period, most of us have a high viral load. We are contagious.

After infection peaks, our immune systems fight to reduce our viral load. As days pass, we become less sick and less contagious. Then we recover and test negative.

Recovery Certificates for Travel

Once you have recovered you can apply for a COVID-19 recovery certificate. This can make travel easier. PCR tests can detect traces of COVID-19 up to 90 days after infection. And many companies choose antigen tests instead.

Recovery and vaccination should give you a degree of immunity from COVID-19. But even as we learn more about this virus, it is vital to stay on our toes.

Need Antigen Tests for Your Team?

Antigen rapid tests are now a commodity in most homes and businesses. And with such high demand, buying in bulk is best for peace of mind.

Ovus Medical stocks FDA-approved COVID-19 rapid tests. They detect lower than normal viral load samples. So you can catch infection faster than with other antigen rapid tests.

They are for point-of-care use, but you don’t need training or special equipment to use them. Each pack has 25 test kits and clear instructions.

Stock up today. Avoid the rush tomorrow.
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How Does COVID -19 Testing Work? A Complete Guide

Have you picked up a cough or cold in the last few days?

Naturally, many people who are starting to feel sick wonder if they have picked up the coronavirus that continues to spread all over the world.

How exactly does COVID-19 testing work?

There are several ways to detect the virus, including PCR and Covid-19 at home rapid tests, but antigen rapid tests can be performed from the comfort of your own home.

They can also provide accurate results in under an hour.

Are you interested in learning more about how these antigen tests work and how to use them when you are starting to feel under the weather?

In this article, we will take a deep dive into antigen testing for the coronavirus and leave you with everything you need to know to get started testing at home. Read on to find out more about antigen testing.

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What Is a COVID Rapid Antigen Test?

Home antigen COVID tests are used to detect the presence of a specific active virus inside a person’s body. They are very fast, and some tests can return results in as soon as fifteen minutes.

Antigen tests used in schools or organizations can be performed on-site.

Healthcare professionals call this “point-of-care” testing. This is an effective way to screen a large asymptomatic population quickly, even if they haven’t had any known exposure.

If a person does test positive, the school or organization can quickly isolate that individual to limit spread to the rest of the community. They can also find close contacts and help to reduce the risk of transmission of the virus further.

Within a school or public organization, antigen testing is primarily a screening tool that helps scout out positive results. It is not used as a diagnostic tool as much in medical settings, although it can be used when someone first presents to the hospital.

Scientists have created models that show that point-of-care testing is really valuable. Self-administered tests as surveillance have a quick turnaround time. With a contagious virus such as COVID-19, this is extremely valuable because time is of the essence.

Overall antigen testing is an important tool in preventing the spread of disease.

How Do Antigen Tests Work in COVID-19 Testing?

You might be familiar with COVID tests administered at your primary care office or testing site. The at-home antigen tests work similarly.

You will place a testing swab into your nose and mouth and circle the swab around several times to ensure a good sample. You will then follow instructions to transfer the swab into a testing solution.

The goal of these tests is to find a specific protein associated with the coronavirus. Antigens are small particles present in the virus that can transfer onto a testing swab. If the antigen is found, a positive result appears on the testing strip in a matter of minutes, like a pregnancy test.

This is helpful because getting your results quickly gives you time to take the right actions. You can make individualized decisions about how to quarantine and keep yourself from spreading the virus to others. You can also plan to get medical care and prevent the transmission cycle.

There are other types of testing for COVID-19, but the antigen test is the fastest test for use at home. A PCR test in a doctor’s office might be more accurate and give a definitive result.

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When Should You Take an At-Home Test?

You may already be fully vaccinated for COVID-19. Still, it makes sense to bring out an at-home test if you are feeling unwell. You may be experiencing a breakthrough infection.

While most breakthrough infections will be far less severe if you have been vaccinated, it is still important to understand if you have the virus and can spread to others.

It’s also a good idea to swab yourself before you go to an indoor event with a lot of other people. If you are planning a dinner with a group of friends, travel for the holidays, or a large event like a concert, you’ll be better off knowing if you have tested positive. Moreover, others will be grateful that you have done your due diligence in testing positive or negative.

Rapid tests are viewed by doctors and scientists as a screening tool. By the time you get back a PCR test or another more accurate test, the results may not even be that meaningful.

Perhaps you exposed yourself to more people in the meantime, so the result can’t really be definitive. It is possible to become infected during the waiting window.

The key is to take the test as close to the time you are planning your event as possible. That is how you can be most certain of your results. Aiming for the same day is a reasonable goal.

How Accurate Are Antigen Tests?

Naturally, you may wonder about the COVID antigen test accuracy.

It is certainly true that PCR tests are more sensitive than antigen tests. This means that you are less likely to have a false negative with a PCR test. PCR tests will detect more true positives than antigen tests, and for that reason, they are a more definitive test.

Still, antigen tests are very accurate, especially when you are the most infectious. Actually, during the time frame of being infectious. antigen tests are nearly as good as PCR tests in terms of accuracy.

A study out of Johns Hopkins University SOM showed that COVID-19 was found 87% of the time in hospital patients who were symptomatic with the disease. They also found that 71% of patients who were asymptomatic tested positive on an antigen test.

False positives are rare with a rapid antigen test, according to leading scientists. If you test positive on an antigen test at home, it is very likely that you truly do have the virus. You should isolate yourself from others.

Following Up

It makes sense to follow up with a PCR test or another antigen test afterward if you are concerned about a positive antigen test. The more tests you take, the greater the accuracy is, even with the same test.

If you have a negative result, that means that the test didn’t find the virus in your system. But in this case, you can’t be quite as confident that it truly isn’t there. It could simply mean that you have the virus, but it is in the earlier stages of infection and has not created enough copies of itself to be detectable.

If you think this could be the case, it makes sense to take another antigen test one or two days later to get a clearer picture. Oftentimes, the home kit that you buy will come with a second copy for this exact reason.

The home test doesn’t bring the ability to identify infection to 100%, but it does provide a lot of value. It is important to remember to take a negative test result with some degree of caution, and know that the test loses its validity as soon as you re-expose yourself in public.

Will An Antigen Test Identify the Omicron Variant?

The omicron variant has become a major force in late 2021 as a leading variant of the virus that is highly transmissible.

As mentioned, it is very possible to miss a positive result during the earlier stages of infection.

Early research by the Food and Drug Administration, working with the National Institute of Health has looked at the rapid antigen tests in conjunction with the highly contagious omicron variant. The NIH Rapid

Acceleration of Diagnostics program showed that rapid antigen tests may not be as good at detecting this variant.

The research employed samples from known infected patients who had the omicron variant. They wanted to specifically look at the ability of at-home antigen tests to detect the virus.

The early data from the study shows that antigen tests do a good job of detecting the omicron variant still, but with reduced sensitivity. It is still very possible to miss an infection with an antigen test.

It also depends on the specific antigen that the test is trying to find. To get into the biology a bit, some tests look for the nucleocapsid, rather than the spike protein. The nucleocapsid is a special RNA-binding protein within the virus that is critical to its survival and growth.

Certain tests still have the ability to detect the omicron variant with similar sensitivity to other variants, per the FDA.

The Bottom Line

When it comes to COVID-19 testing, the COVID-19 home tests that rely on antigens are the fastest tool for the job. It is true that you will sacrifice some accuracy that may be beneficial in other settings, but antigen tests are the true workhorses of diagnostic testing in the pandemic.

If you or a loved one is developing symptoms of COVID-19, you should seek medical care immediately.

At-home tests may be valuable to you in determining if you have the virus. For more information, please check out our other articles on COVID-19 home tests. Contact us here if you are interested in ordering home tests.

What Is the Most Common Drug Test for Employment?

When looking at the statistics for drug use, the most common drug test for employment comes into play. A study by the National Council on Alcohol and Drug Dependence estimates that alcohol and drug misuse costs over $81 billion annually in lost productivity. This, in turn, causes a 300 percent increase in medical costs for employers.

Mental and physical impairment in the workplace causes a decrease in employee productivity. This leads to over $49 billion in missed workdays and employer costs.

The past five years alone have seen a substantial increase in drug and alcohol use in the workplace.

But what can you do about it? Find out about the most common drug test for employment. And how it can help your business prevent costly drug and alcohol-related employee expenses.

What Is the Most Common Drug Test for Employment?

There are many different ways to check for drugs in the workplace, but what is the most common drug test for employment? The most common drug test is the urine test used to check for illicit substances in established employees.

By regularly administering a urine drug test for work, employers can ensure that their employees are not engaging in drug or alcohol abuse that may impede their performance in the workplace.

This also helps to reduce the number of workplace accidents that may occur if an employee shows mental or physical impairment due to drug use.

What Do Employers Look for in a Drug Test?

Employers are looking for any number of illegal and legal substances that may impair an employee’s ability to function.

Chronic abuse can occur with the misuse of prescription medications and street drugs. As well as alcohol and certain over-the-counter medications. Stimulants and depressants give their users extreme highs and crashing lows.

Substance impairment pertains to any situation where an employee is unable to focus or control their body due to substance abuse. This can be especially dangerous in warehouse settings where heavy boxes and pallets may be in use. Or around any sort of machinery or equipment that requires specialized training to operate.

Employees who are not fully aware of their environment can cause harm to themselves or others. They may damage expensive equipment in the process.

With rising costs to account for these problems, your company may have to foot the bill. You’ll be paying for employee drug rehabilitation programs and worker’s comp cases. As well as, missed work hours that can affect your company’s productivity rates.

Furthermore, this can damage your company’s reputation as a whole. You want to make sure you’re hiring the best and most competent employees possible. So, drug testing becomes a necessary tool to monitor and assess their performance.

Urine drug panel tests can screen anywhere from 5 to 18 different types of drugs and substances, depending on the panel test purchased. These tests can detect a multitude of drugs in as little as 5 minutes.

The 18-panel comprehensive drug test can screen for Marijuana, Amphetamines, Cocaine, Methadone, Fentanyl, MDMA, Buprenorphine, Kratom, MDMA, Methamphetamines, PCP, Opiates, Oxycodone, and Tricyclic Antidepressants. They can even detect alcohol through Ethyl Glucuronide testing.

What Do Pre-Employment Drug Tests Look For?

Employers may use pre-employment drug testing as a condition of an extension of employment to an individual. They must be negative of illicit substances before they can be officially hired for a particular job. Pre-employment drug tests may test for the more commonly abused drugs such as Marijuana, PCP, Amphetamines, Opiates, and Cocaine.

What is the most common pre-employment drug test? A standard 5-panel urine test will screen for these frequently used substances.

Marijuana is legal in some states for medical and recreational use. But it is still illegal for the federal government, public safety, and national security sectors. The laws are always subject to change at any time.

The Americans with Disabilities Act

The Americans with Disabilities Act provides certain protections for individuals with a physical or mental impairment in the workplace. Employees cannot be denied employment or fired due to certain mental and physical disabilities. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 employers cannot fire, refuse to hire, or refuse to promote someone simply because she or he has a history of substance use.

Employers also cannot fire, refuse to hire, or refuse to promote employees merely because they are enrolled in a drug or alcohol rehabilitation program. Employers cannot single out particular employees whom they think may be under the influence or showing signs of impairment that may be attributed to their disability. Employers may also not ask for an employee’s prescription medication use before hiring or promoting as this can also violate the ADA in some states.

The Americans with Disabilities Act also protects those who take medications for their disability that may cause them to act like they appear intoxicated. For example, benzodiazepines with anticonvulsant properties for the treatment of seizures.

Do Pre-Employment Drug Tests Check for Alcohol?

Depending on state laws, employers may be able to test for alcohol via a urine test. This involves purchasing a specific EtG test, or Ethyl Glucuronide testing cup. These specialized tests can detect the presence of alcohol in a prospective employee’s urine within 24-48 hours of initial consumption.

Again this varies on a state-by-state basis as some states have more stringent laws on what may or may not be tested.

While urine tests can detect a wide array of intoxicants in an individual’s urine, the possibility of contamination or an attempt to alter the sample is very high. Some individuals may try to sneak in clean urine from another person so they can avoid testing. Others may try to intentionally dilute or contaminate their sample so they’ll have to have a do-over at a later date.

Administering Urine Drug Tests

Some states require employees to be informed of routine or surprise drug testing policies in writing before employment begins. An employee may refuse a drug test as long as it is made clear that doing so may terminate their employment.

You may administer a urine test on a random or scheduled basis depending on your industry and drug screening frequency needs. Some states have protections against a company applying a blanket test to all employees.

They require reasonable suspicion for a particular employee who is suspected of using drugs. You may administer a drug test if this employee in question poses a danger to themselves or others through intoxication. As long as it does not infringe upon the rights in the ADA.

Administration of a urine test must take place in a state-sanctioned drug-testing lab. Depending on the circumstances, a technician may be present to assure that the urine comes from a specific individual and is not tampered with or altered in any way. The urine may be tested within the facility itself or sent off to a third-party testing site.

Some urine testing cups have panels built-in that can detect certain substances in a matter of minutes. Others may involve dipping single special drug testing strips into a urine sample to detect a particular drug or a card with multiple drug strips to achieve a specified number of panel results.

Saliva Drug Tests

Saliva tests are another popular form of workplace employment drug testing. They involve checking the levels of a substance inside an existing or potential employee’s saliva through a cheek swab or special Q-tip that is placed inside the employee’s cheek.

These tests can be done in plain view of the screener as there is no invasive testing that requires an employee to use a bathroom in a drug testing clinic.

There’s also no waiting to produce a sample as there is with a urine test because saliva is constantly available inside the mouth. There is less chance of tampering with the sample as it does not involve the use of a bathroom facility. Saliva tests have a 99% accuracy level and only require a small amount of fluid to get a read.

They can produce results in under 15 minutes. The window for testing is much shorter than urine tests.

You can administer saliva tests in the field after an accident or incident and still show recent drug use. They have a recommended use of a half-hour of to 24 hours from the time of suspected drug use.

They are also affordable and can come in quantities as large as 1000 for just $2.99 per swab, along with bulk urine drug tests. Saliva tests are the second most common drug test for employment. They can detect up to 10 common drugs.

Quality Drug Testing Supplies

At Ovus Medical, we have a large selection of drug testing supplies. Including drug testing saliva swabs, drug testing cups, drug testing strips, and drug testing cards. We sell urine drug test cups in bulk, the most common drug test for employment.

Our products are FDA approved and some are even suitable for at-home testing. Check out our full line of drug testing products available on our website. We offer free shipping on orders over $99.

Check out Ovus Medical today. Contact Us to start your bulk order.

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Which Is More Accurate, Saliva or Urine Drug Test?

If you’re an employer looking to implement a company drug testing policy, it’s essential to know your available testing options: saliva or urine.

But which one do you use and why? Is a saliva or urine drug test more accurate? Understanding how each drug test works is imperative to successfully conduct the most appropriate and relevant drug testing policy in your workplace.

In this article, we will cover everything you need to know about urine tests and saliva tests (also known as oral fluid tests) so that you can confidently select the right one for you.

The Difference Between a Saliva and Urine Drug Test

There are a few differences and similarities between urine and saliva drug tests, each with pros and cons. While urine is still the most commonly used test, the advancements in saliva oral swabs have come a long way, causing them to gain more and more popularity for their simplicity, accuracy, and convenience. Let’s discuss each in more detail.

Rapid Urine Testing

Urine tests are the most common type of test administered by employers, and a urine drug test will show the existence of any substance in the donor’s system, even after the substance effects have worn off.

These tests typically come in test cups and can screen for between five and eighteen different substances. This gives you a range of options depending on what you want to screen for.

10-Panel drug tests are typically used in a workplace setting. These 10-panel tests screen will for amphetamine (AMP), barbiturate (BAR), buprenorphine (BUP), cocaine (COC), marijuana (THC), MDMA (MDMA/Molly), methadone (MTD), methamphetamine (MET), opiates (OPI/MOR), and oxycodone (OXY).

Learn drug test abbreviations here.

How Are Urine Tests Administered?

Although using a urine testing kit, you will need a gender-specific invigilator and a private restroom; the test is administered with these easy steps:

  1. Put the date on the label and have the donor initial it
  2. The donor deposits a urine specimen in the cup and seals the cap
  3. Start timer immediately
  4. The operator checks the cap for tightness and removes the peel off label
  5. Check the strip label 4-5 minutes after the timer began
  6. Green will appear to indicate the temperature of the sample (the correct range is 90-100 degrees F)
  7. The result are revealed by either one band in the control region (positive) or two bands in both the control and test region (negative).

Results should not be read after one hour. A single band in the test (T) region indicates an invalid test.

How Reliable Are Urine Drug Tests?

While it’s noteworthy that no drug test of this type can be 100% accurate but, if conducted correctly, the urine drug test accuracy can be close to 99%. Regardless, it’s important to note that certain factors could interfere with the accuracy of the results. Accuracy can be affected by:

  • how the test is administered
  • the way the test was stored
  • how the urine sample was stored
  • what the donor consumed beforehand (i.e., food, drink)
  • any other prescribed drugs the donor may be taking already
  • testing for the wrong drugs
  • missing the drug’s window of detection

When a positive result is returned, sending the sample off to a lab for further testing is vital, as some prescribed medications can produce a false-positive, most commonly for amphetamines.

Rapid Saliva Testing

Rapid saliva testing, also known as Rapid Oral Fluid Testing, is quickly gaining popularity for several reasons. For example, collecting a saliva sample can be 100% monitored, whereas monitoring a urine sample collection becomes a little more complex.

Additionally, where urine samples require the drug to metabolize in the system in order to be detected (typically 6-12 hours), oral swabs can detect recent substance abuse. Because of this, it is the ideal choice whenever the need to detect recent usage is paramount.

How Is an Oral Swab Test Administered?

Another reason oral swabs are becoming more popular is that they are so easy to use. All swab tests are conducted using the same fundamental steps:

  1. Insert the sponge end of the test stick into the mouth for between three and five minutes to collect a sample
  2. Ensure swab is soaked in saliva for most accurate results
  3. Insert collection stick vertically into the test tube and seal the lid
  4. Keeping the test tube vertical, read the results after ten minutes of closing the tube’s lid
  5. The result are revealed by either one band in the control region (positive) or two bands in both the control and test region (negative).

Results should not be read after eight minutes. A single band in the test (T) region indicates an invalid test.

How Reliable Are Saliva Drug Tests?

If conducted correctly, the drug testing swab test accuracy is close to 98%; however, there are a couple of things that could interfere with the accuracy of the test, such as:

  • the type of test used
  • the quality of the test
  • the substance type
  • the substance’s concentration
  • the skill of the person administering the test
  • the testing facility
  • the test being administered during the correct timing window

Is a Saliva or Urine Drug Test More Accurate?

While comparing the two types of tests is like comparing apples with oranges, it’s safe to say the following:

  • Traditionally, lab testing will yield the most accurate results
  • Urine and blood tests are more accurate
  • A urine drug test can be close to 99% accurate
  • A saliva drug test can be close to 98% accurate

Cut-Off Concentration Levels

The guidelines set by SAMHSA to determine drug abuse state there has to be cut-off concentrations for both urine and oral swab tests. This level is established to determine when a test will return as positive or negative, depending on the amount of substance found in the user’s system.

Cut-off concentration levels are represented in nanograms per milliliter (ng/mL) and differ from drug to drug.

Window of Detection

It’s essential to know how long a drug can remain in the user’s system so you can administer the test at the right time for the most accurate results. However, several factors can cause detection times to change, such as metabolism, weight, tolerance, frequency of use, and quantity of use.

Let’s review the detection periods of some of the most commonly tested for drugs:

  • Amphetamines
    • Abbreviation: AMP
    • Detection period: 1-2 days
    • Cut-Off Level: 50ng/mL
  • Barbiturates
    • Abbreviation: BAR
    • Detection period: 1-4 days
    • Cut-Off Level: 50ng/mL
  • Benzodiazepines
    • Abbreviation: BZO
    • Detection period: 1-2 days
    • Cut-Off Level: 50ng/mL
  • Buprenorphine
    • Abbreviation: BUP
    • Detection period: 2-6 days
    • Cut-Off Level: 10ng/mL
  • Cocaine
    • Abbreviation: COC
    • Detection period: 2-4 days
    • Cut-Off Level: 20ng/mL
  • Morphine
    • Abbreviation: OPI
    • Detection period: 2-4 days
    • Cut-Off Level: 40ng/mL
  • Marijuana
  • Methamphetamine
    • Abbreviation: MET
    • Detection period: 2-4 days
    • Cut-Off Level: 50ng/mL
  • Oxycodone
    • Abbreviation: OXY
    • Detection period: 1-3 days
    • Cut-Off Level: 20ng/mL
  • Phencyclidine
    • Abbreviation: PCP
    • Detection period: 7-14 days
    • Cut-Off Level: 10ng/mL

Overview at a Glance: Saliva vs. Urine Tests

To make things a bit easier, let’s go over some of the pros and cons at a glance. We will be comparing both types of tests to more easily note the differences.

Urine:

  • Pros:
    • Preliminary results are provided by qualitative screening
    • Remains the most accepted standards of drug testing with the broadest range of testing options
    • Can test for both illegal drugs and prescribed medications
    • Has a longer window of detection time once the substance has been metabolized
    • Fast and accurate results in typically 5 minutes or less

 

  • Cons:
    • Does not detect recent drug use (only detects after 6-12 hours)
    • Requires a private restroom
    • Requires donor to have a full bladder to participate
    • Can require gender-specific staff to administer or observe
    • Unpleasant to handle
    • Non-observed sample collection introduces the possibility of contamination, substitution, dilution, or another such tampering

Saliva:

  • Pros:
    • Preliminary results are provided by qualitative screening
    • Ideal for situations where recent drug use needs to be screened for
    • Non-invasive and does not require much privacy
    • No requirement of a full bladder to participate
    • Can be administered by any gender staff
    • Less unpleasant to handle
    • Is ideal for detecting recent use of substances
    • Due to being 100% monitored, there is no chance of tampering
    • Fast and accurate results in typically 10 minutes or less
  • Cons:
    • Shorter window of detection
    • Limited number of drugs can be tested via oral swabs

Make Your Selection Today

Knowing the appropriate drug test to administer in various settings is vital if you want everything to run swiftly and professionally. When asking “is a saliva or urine drug test more accurate” the ultimate takeaway is that both types of tests will yield reasonably accurate results.

In both cases, any positive results should be sent to a lab for further analysis before any formal decisions concerning the donor.

If you’re looking for accurate test kits, we have both oral swabs and urine tests ranging from 5-panel through to 18-panel. Visit our shop to find the ideal test for your needs. Bulk orders are also available.

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What Does MTD Mean on a Drug Test? A Complete Guide

According to a survey of fifteen experts in the substance abuse field, it’s estimated that at a 50% testing rate, 40% will be daily users.

If you’re an employer looking to screen for additional drugs, you might be considering a methadone (MTD) test. But how do you know which one to use? And what does it mean if your employee tests positive for the MTD drug?

Keep reading as we cover everything around the question, “what does MTD mean on a drug test?”

What is Methadone?

During World War II, German doctors created Methadone, also known as MTD. When MTD was brought over to the USA, doctors initially used it to treat patients in extreme pain. While its effects are slower than other painkillers like morphine, it additionally blocks the high people get from substances such as heroin, cocaine, morphine, and oxycodone.

As a result, methadone has been used since the 1950s to treat opioid dependence. It’s administered as a pill or in a liquid form daily, which reduces withdrawal symptoms and cravings for opiates.

How Long Does Methadone Stay In Your System?

Clinical opinions differ among doctors on how long MTD remains in one’s system. It varies anywhere from two days up to as many as thirteen days.

Despite MTD being naturally processed out of your system within two weeks, some drug tests can still pick up traces of the substance for a short while after.

Why Test for Drugs?

When talking about methadone drug testing, there are many reasons one might want to test for this. For example, suppose you’re a family member and have noticed an extreme change in a loved one’s personality and behavior. In that case, you might want to administer a drug test so you can identify the problem and get treatment soonest.

Additionally, if you’re a known user, you might be tested weekly to ensure you’re no longer abusing substances. Or, if you’re an employer, you may want to administer random drug tests to ensure your staff is not using illicit drugs.

However, if you’re a clinician, you might be testing for MTD to ensure your patient takes their medication as required.

Does Methadone Show Up on a Drug Test?

Not all drug tests include screening for methadone. However, if the test provides methadone screening, it will appear on a drug test.

The MTD drug screen is most commonly included from the 10-panel drug tests and up.

Types of Tests

There are two main ways to test for the MTD drug: a cup test or an oral swab. To get you more familiar with them, we’ll cover both of them here in more detail.

Drug Test Cups

Drug test cups are the most common for screening for drugs. They’re easy to use, readily accessible, and very accurate. However, they do require privacy in the form of a restroom to administer.

10-Panel Drug Test

The 10-panel MTD drug test screens for Amphetamine (AMP), Barbiturate (BAR), Buprenorphine (BUP), Cocaine (COC), Marijuana (THC), MDMA (MDMA/Molly), Methadone (MTD), Methamphetamine (MET), Opiates (OPI/MOR), Oxycodone (OXY).

You administer the test with these easy steps:

  1. Put the date on the label and have the donor initial it
  2. The donor deposits a urine specimen in the cup and seals the cap
  3. Start timer immediately
  4. The operator checks the cap for tightness and removes the peel off label
  5. Check the strip label 4-5 minutes after the timer began
  6. Green will appear to indicate the temperature of the sample (the correct range is 90-100 degrees F)
  7. The result are revealed by either one band in the control region (positive) or two bands in both the control and test region (negative).

Results should not be read after one hour. A single band in the test (T) region indicates an invalid test.

Oral Swabs

Oral swabs use saliva to screen for drugs and are administered by collecting a sample from the donor’s mouth. The benefit of oral swabs is that they don’t require the same amount of privacy as urine samples and can be administered swiftly on the spot or in the privacy of a nearby room.

Saliva oral swabs typically test for these ten substances:

Amphetamine (AMP), Barbiturate (BAR), Benzodiazepines (BZO), Buprenorphine (BUP), Cocaine (COC), Marijuana (THC), MDMA (MDMA), Methamphetamine (MET), Oxycodone (OXY), and Phencyclidine (PCP).

You administer the test via these simple steps:

  1. Insert the sponge end of the test stick into the mouth for between three and five minutes to collect a sample
  2. Ensure swab is soaked in saliva for most accurate results
  3. Insert collection stick vertically into the test tube and seal the lid
  4. Keeping the test tube vertical, read the results after ten minutes of closing the tube’s lid
  5. The result are revealed by either one band in the control region (positive) or two bands in both the control and test region (negative).

Results should not be read after eight minutes. A single band in the test (T) region indicates an invalid test.

What Does MTD Mean on a Drug Test?

So what does it mean if the test comes back positive for methadone? Since methadone is not commonly used on the streets, a positive result will most likely mean that the user is on a treatment program for a previous opioid addiction and is taking their medication regularly.

However, it’s also important to note that people can become addicted to methadone, so it is essential to understand the treatment program prescribed.

The side effects of methadone can include, but is not limited to, the following:

  • Constricted pupils
  • Constipation
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Heat intolerance
  • Dizziness or fainting
  • Light Headedness
  • Dry mouth
  • Low blood pressure
  • Sleep problems
  • Hallucinations or confusion
  • Sedation
  • Weakness
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Sweating

Expand Your Screening to Include Methadone

Understanding what does MTD mean on a drug test is vital if you screen your patients or staff for the MTD drug. If a test you’ve administered comes up positive, it’s crucial to inquire further about why it came up positive.

If the user is on a treatment program, familiarise yourself with the program to note any irregularities or potential abuse.

If you’re looking to purchase tests that screen for methadone, we have multiple test options, from 5-panel through to 18-panel. We will have the test for you, from urine test cups to oral swabs. Contact us for bulk orders.

Buy Methadone Test Strips Here

How To Read a Pregnancy Test?

Pregnancy is one of the most unique stages in a woman’s life. Whether you are looking to bring new life into this world or it comes as a surprise, learning that you are pregnant is often an astonishing moment. Women all around the world think about pregnancy and its implications each day.

If you think you may be pregnant, knowing how to read a pregnancy test correctly is one of the most important pieces of the journey. You want to understand your results, so that you may make informed decisions based on them. Join us to learn about how to read a pregnancy test!

How To Read a Pregnancy Test

As you are taking a pregnancy test, you may be filled with many emotions. It is important to follow your specific test’s instructions to ensure that you are using it correctly.

Digital tests are preferred by some women because of the simplicity of the results. The screen will simply say ‘Pregnant’ or ‘Not Pregnant’ after the sample has been taken and time elapsed.

Two window tests are also easy enough to navigate. The control box will have a negative symbol, and if you are found to be pregnant, there will be a plus sign in the results window. Once again, read your specific instructions to know exactly what to look for.

Do Pregnancy Tests Expire?

The short answer is yes! Just like food, pregnancy tests should have a date of expiration listed on the box. Typically, this will be 2-3 years from the date the test was made.

Be sure to monitor this date, as an old test may cause a false result. Another tip to keeping your results as accurate as possible is keeping your test at a suitable temperature. Experts suggest that they should be stored between 36-86 degrees Fahrenheit.

How Common Are False Negative Pregnancy Tests?

Compared with other medical tests, a pregnancy test reading is one of the more accurate. It is estimated that around 5% come back with a false result.

If you are unsure whether your result is correct, you can always take a second one to confirm. A false result may populate if you take the test too early in the day, or have drunk an abundance of water. If your period is more than a week late after your first negative result, it may be wise to try it again.

Check out the team at Ovus Medical to learn more about the accuracy of pregnancy strips. This helpful guide will help you to understand the potential margin of error.

How To Use Pregnancy Test

Most pregnancy tests are performed at home with a simple urine test. While some may be done at medical facilities and take your blood work, this is the most popular way.

Begin by washing your hands before you start the process. Remove the test from its packaging, and take off the plastic cap. You should see the absorbent window that will take the sample. The process of how to read a urine pregnancy test strip is also the same.

There are two options to take your urine sample. Perhaps the easiest is to point the absorbent tip directly into your urine stream. Keep the tip under for 7-10 seconds so that it collects a good sample. The other method is to urinate into a sterile container and place the tip in the sample for 10 seconds.

How Long Do You Wait To Read a Pregnancy Test?

The instructions of your pregnancy test will specify how long to wait before reading the result. Though it may vary, some are between 1-2 minutes.

Be sure to not read it before, or far after the specified window. We recommend using a timer to keep track of when you should view the test so that you will not wait too long.

How Long Should I Wait Before Taking a Pregnancy Test?

If you have had unprotected sex and suspect you may be pregnant, there can be a great urge to take a test as soon as possible to confirm or deny this. However, there is a certain window you must wait to get an accurate result.

Many women wait to see if their period will arrive on time. If it does not, you certainly may still not be pregnant. However, the day after your period was supposed to come but did not can be a good starting point for taking a pregnancy test.

If you are anxious and would like a test before, please wait for one to two weeks after you had sex- your body needs to develop the hormones for the pregnancy test to detect. The average window to detect pregnancy is 7-12 days after the implantation of the egg.

How Much Is a Pregnancy Test?

If you are looking into home pregnancy tests, expect to pay between $8-$15. Some test kits come with 2 or 3, providing more value. This may be a great option if you are hoping to get pregnant and will be testing regularly!

We Wish You Luck

Taking a pregnancy test can produce both excitement and anxiety. Being educated on what to expect in the process is the best way to get fast and accurate results that you can count on! We hope this article helped you feel confident about how to read a pregnancy test.

Your friends at Ovus Medical offer very affordable options for pregnancy test strips. Starting at only $0.59 per strip, these are some of the least expensive strips on the market to buy pregnancy test strips in bulk. Check out their options if you would like to stock up on easy-to-use tests that provide results in five minutes!

Buy Pregnancy Strips Here

 


Saliva Drug Test Detection Times: What You Should Know

The appearance of drugs within the body, like blood and urine testing, is detectable on varying timelines depending on the substance in question.
Like other testing alternatives, saliva drug tests primarily look for drug metabolites. These are the chemicals left behind after the body has processed a specific substance. The question is – what are the saliva drug test detection times? What substances and how long can an oral swab test detect them? Read on to find out.

How to read mouth swab drug test results

Evaluators typically use the Enzyme immunoassay technology for screening mouth swabs. To confirm the results, evaluators retest any positive samples using more specific methods, such as liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, and mass spectrometry. They use oral mouth swabs for various purposes, including pre-employment screening, random or period testing, and post-accident testing. Some police departments also use saliva drug tests for roadside drug testing when they suspect someone is driving while high on marijuana or other drugs.

How do they work?

The least invasive method of drug testing is the mouth swab drug test. There is no need for needles or peeing in a cup.

All mouth swab drug tests follow the same basic procedure: First, swab the inside of the cheek with a collection stick or a sponge for a few minutes. Then replace the stick into the collection tube. Finally, hand the device to the evaluator.

On-site or in a lab, the sample is analyzed for traces of substances.

These tests also don’t require much preparation, though you’re typically instructed not to eat or drink anything for 10 minutes before the test.

So what are the saliva drug test detection times? Which drugs can it test? Below are some saliva drug test facts you should know.

Saliva Drug Test Detection Times

Methamphetamine

Methamphetamine, also known as meth, is a stimulant that can be smoked, snorted, or ingested to produce euphoric effects. Meth is not a naturally occurring substance. Drug creators make them in a makeshift laboratory with acetone, hydrochloric acid, ammonia, and ephedrine. Its half-life in the body is longer than that of other similar drugs, such as cocaine, with byproducts peaking around 12 hours after use.

Marijuana

When smoked or consumed in other ways, marijuana, a drug derived from a plant that is now legal in several states, produces euphoric effects.
Its metabolites are stored in fat cells and slowly released into the bloodstream, giving it a much longer life in the body than most standard substances, particularly for long-term users. Fat cells tend to persist in the average person, resulting in detection windows of up to six weeks via metabolites via blood or urine testing.

Unlike urine tests, which look for the metabolite THC-COOH, oral swab tests look for THC itself because it remains in the saliva before being metabolized within the body. Saliva tests can detect marijuana use within the last 24 hours, making them a popular choice for police officers and others seeking confirmation of recent use.

Cocaine

Cocaine is a popular drug among people of all socioeconomic backgrounds and social classes. It is a stimulant that is commonly snorted in its pure form, smoked, or injected in its impure form known as crack. However, cocaine has a short detection window, due to metabolites like benzoylecgonine and ecgonine methyl ester remaining in the body for up to 48 hours. Cocaine is only detected in drug tests for two to three days on average. This is also true for saliva tests; after 72 hours, an oral swab cannot detect the presence of cocaine or its metabolites.

Other Opiates and Heroin

According to recent overdose statistics, heroin is now an epidemic in the United States, with unprecedented levels of use.
As a result, heroin and other opiates like hydrocodone and fentanyl are common drug testing targets.

Do mouth swabs test for opiates?
While there are far too many analogs to test for individually, most comprehensive drug panels now screen for as many opioid substances as possible.
Because not all opiates are created equal, the amount of time they spend in the body can differ. In general, drug tests can detect heroin and many other opiates in saliva for 24 to 36 hours. This is less than the time required for detection in urine or hair tests. Some opiates, on the other hand, may be detectable for a longer period of time.
For example, OxyContin is an extended-release oxycodone that stays in the body longer. In addition, many street opiates, mainly illegally produced pressed pills, can contain unknown components and analogs, adding to the ambiguity in testing.

Benzodiazepines

Because of the widespread abuse of drugs like Xanax, a popular anti-anxiety medication, benzodiazepines are frequently included in specialized drug panels.
However, because benzodiazepine is a drug class, many different substances fall into this category. So, detection can vary greatly.
Saliva drug tests can detect Benzodiazepines longer than other testing methods, but the duration varies greatly depending on the drug in question.
Because diazepam is a long-acting benzo, diazepam, nordiazepam, temazepam, and oxazepam metabolites can be detected up to 10 days after use. Intermediate-acting benzodiazepine-like lorazepam is only detectable for about five days. This is due to the body’s increased rate of metabolizing the present substance.

MDMA

Ecstasy, also known as Molly, is a popular rave drug on college campuses and parties. Standard six-panel drug screenings typically include Ecstasy due to its widespread use.

The metabolites of MDMA, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), 4-hydroxy-3-methoxymethamphetamine (HMMA), and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyamphetamine (HMA) can be detected in saliva one hour after use.
However, the life of MDMA in saliva is shorter than that of other testing methods. Most traces will be gone within 24 hours.

Alcohol

Alcohol is not included in most blood or urine tests due to the rate at which it is metabolized in the body.
Unless consumed immediately before a test, the average person can have a few drinks the night before, sleep it off, and test negative the next morning.
On the other hand, saliva tests have a wider detection window and may detect alcohol after the body has metabolized it. A test using saliva can detect alcohol for six to twelve hours after the body has metabolized it.

These are some of the drugs that saliva drug tests can detect. If you need oral swabs that are 99% accurate, CLIA-waived and FDA-approved, check out the Ovus Medical Store. We have a wide variety of mouth swabs, drug testing cups, and drug tests in bulk you can choose from.

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Hair Follicle Drug Test vs. Urine Drug Test: Which is Better?

The urine drug test is one of the most widely used drug detection methods. But how does it fare against the hair follicle drug test? Which is better? Which is right for your needs and preferences? Read on to find out.

Urine Drug Screening

Urine drug screening is one of the simplest and least expensive drug testing methods. It is simple to administer at home or at work, though it may be preferable to have professional guidance and supervision, as well as the use of proper lab equipment, for more accurate results. Urine drug testing can detect drug and alcohol use in as little as one or two weeks. Urine testing has several notable flaws and loopholes. Because the drugs take time to appear in the urine, they would only be detectable after three hours. Simple adulteration methods can also have an impact on urine tests.

Urine tests can also detect benzodiazepines, which are commonly found in sleeping pills and can significantly impair a worker’s ability to perform work duties safely. Because benzodiazepine levels in oral fluid are extremely low, current on-site oral fluid testing devices have a much lower chance of detecting this drug.

Here are the detection times of some of the most popular drugs:

  • Alcohol: 3-5 days in urine
  • Amphetamines: 1-3 days in urine
  • Barbiturates: 2-4 days in urine
  • Benzodiazepines: 3-6 weeks in urine
  • Cannabis: 7-30 days in urine
  • Cocaine: 3-4 days in urine
  • Codeine: 1 day in urine
  • Heroin: 3-4 days in urine
  • LSD: 1-3 days in urine
  • MDMA (ecstasy): 3-4 days in urine
  • Methamphetamine (crystal meth): 3-6 days in urine
  • Methadone: 3-4 days in urine
  • Morphine: 2-3 days in urine

Hair Follicle Drug Test

Hair follicle drug testing, also known as hair drug test, can screen a longer history of drug or alcohol use, up to 3 to 6 months after consumption. This method of drug testing is capable of determining drug abuse patterns. This is because the chemical in the drugs enters the bloodstream and becomes a part of the hair cells as they grow. Additionally, it reveals virtually all possibilities for cheating. 

Hair tests are undoubtedly pricier than urine tests, but the results cannot be changed or “flushed” out of your system. Many people prefer a hair test over a urine test because the accuracy is significantly higher.

Despite the fact that hair tests have many advantages, there are a few drawbacks. The results of hair tests can take up to 7-10 business days to arrive. In addition, a hair test requires at least 1.5-inch of hair to be cut off in person and sent to the lab. Drugs will not be detectable until 5-7 days after use due to the rate of hair growth. The hair follicle is extracted from the scalp’s root, and a 1.5-inch follicle can be up to 3 months old. Overall, a hair test can be a more reliable alternative to a urine test for obtaining the most accurate results.

Which One Is Right for You?

So the question is – which one should you use? It all depends on your needs and preferences. If you want to get results quickly, with 99% accuracy, then a urine drug test will be the best choice for you. Now, if you want accurate results and have at least 90 days to spare, then, go for a hair follicle drug test.

If you need the best-priced, 99% accurate, CLIA-waived and FDA-approved urine drug tests, check out the Ovus Medical Store. We have a wide array of drug tests you can choose from.

What are the different drug test types?

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What is the Most Common Drug Test for Employment?

The most common drug test for employment can improve workplace safety and productivity. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMSHA), the majority of substance users work. Statistically, these are the people who are more likely to file a workers’ compensation claim, harm others in an on-the-job accident, miss work frequently, and change jobs often.

So ensuring that everyone on-site is substance-free protects your employees and your company’s reputation, which is why you, the employer, need to include employment drug tests in your hiring and employee retention process.

But what is the most common drug test for employment? How accurate is it? Is it safe? Read on and find out.

What is the most common pre employment drug test?

There are several types of drug tests.

The most common type of pre-employment testing is the urine test, which is typically administered after an offer of employment. It can detect traces of drug use even after the effects of the drug have worn off and the drug has been removed from the body for an extended period. Typical drugs tested in a pre-employment urine drug screen include cocaine, marijuana, amphetamines and methamphetamines, PCP, and opiates, with employers having the option to test for various substances. More importantly, urinalysis is the only method approved for federally-mandated testing. Therefore, employers typically use it for both non-regulated and regulated employees.

Urine drug tests are a quick and easy way to screen different types of drugs. All it takes is a few minutes from taking the sample to interpreting the results.

There’s also oral drug testing, which is becoming popular too. In this type of test, you give a mouth swab to your employee. Aside from a fast and easy screening process, mouth swabs are convenient too. Unlike urine drug test cups which require privacy, oral drug testing can be done anytime, anywhere.

Other types of drug testing use hair, sweat, and blood. All of these require lab testing.

 

Do pre employment drug tests check for alcohol?

Yes, in states where drug and alcohol testing is allowed. Most companies use the EtG test for this purpose. It can detect the presence of ethyl glucuronide in the urine sample for 24 to 48 hours.

What do pre employment drug tests look for?

Most drug tests look for five of the most common drugs of abuse: opiates, THC, Cocaine, PHP, and Amphetamines. This is why most employers use the five panel urine drug test.

However, some employers want a more detailed drug screen for their employees. Some go as far as testing up to 18 types of illicit drugs such as Amphetamines, Phencyclidine, Marijuana, Methamphetamines, Opiates, Methadone, Benzodiazepines, Methaqualone, Barbiturates, MDMA, Tramadol, Fentanyl, Oxycodone, Alcohol, among others. They use the 18 panel urine drug test cup for this purpose.

Your leadership team must decide what type of test to use when selecting a pre-employment drug testing program.

Consider the most common pre-employment drug test option, as well as available alternatives based on your specific needs. You can check out the Ovus Medical Shop for a huge variety of urine drug test cups in bulk.

Buy Drug Tests Here

How Does Oxycodone Show Up on a Drug Test?

Looking to test for oxycodone in your next round of drug screenings? The wide range of drug tests on the market can be hard to decipher and sift through. When your budget and location limitations come in, the process of finding the right drug test product becomes even more difficult.

To help you find the right drug test product for the substances you’d like to screen for, we’ve put together this guide specifically on oxycodone. In this blog, we’ll answer the question, “Does oxycodone show up on a drug test?” and how to correctly screen for oxycodone use.

Let’s begin.

What Is Oxycodone?

Oxycodone is a substance that interacts with the opioid receptors in the brain. Oxycodone comes from the poppy plant, like other forms of opioids. Prescription oxycodone often comes combined with other pain relievers, such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and acetaminophen.

Medical professionals typically prescribe it as a form of powerful pain relief, but it can be habit-forming and is commonly abused. Using oxycodone for long periods of time can cause users to experience withdrawal symptoms after stopping use.

Those who have recently undergone surgery, serious injury, or trauma might still be legally and responsibly using oxycodone or recently stopped. When choosing to test for oxycodone, it is important to be aware of the test subjects’ prescribed medications.

Does Oxycodone Show Up On Drug Tests?

The short answer is yes, oxycodone shows up on drug tests. To screen properly for oxycodone, however, you’ll need the correct test and technique. Otherwise, you’ll either miss the opportunity to get a positive screening or you’ll invalidate the test.

To check for this substance in a subject’s sample, you’ll need an oxycodone drug test. Oxy drug tests come in a number of different forms, and which one you choose will depend on your budget and needs. You’ll also have to ensure you are testing the subject within a certain window of time after the suspected substance use and follow the exact directions on the test.

What Is OXY On Drug Tests?

To find the right drug test for screening oxycodone use, you’ll need to check for drug tests that list “OXY” as a substance. You can choose to either buy a drug test specifically for oxycodone, or you can buy a multi-drug test that includes OXY in its list of substances.

For How Long Does Oxycodone Show Up On A Drug Test?

When someone uses oxycodone, the substance lingers in their system. Each part of their system can rid the substance over a set period of time, but these periods differ greatly.

For example, oxycodone only stays in the bloodstream for about 24 hours after use. Other parts of the system, however, hold onto this substance for much longer. Saliva can show detection of OXY for 1-4 days, while urine can show detection of OXY for 3-4 days.

What type of test you use will determine the window of time in which you must administer the test. If you get a negative result, it does not necessarily mean that the person has never used oxycodone, but that there isn’t enough in their system to alert the test.

Many biological and environmental factors can also affect how long it takes oxycodone to leave the body. Age, gender, organ function, length of use, and combinations of other substances can affect the body’s ability to flush out oxycodone.

How to Test for Oxycodone

The most standard forms of tests for oxycodone are urine tests and saliva tests. Saliva tests come as swabs while urine tests can come as either test cups or test strips. Both saliva and urine samples can help detect oxycodone use for a few days after the last use.

Both tests utilize a control line and test line function. Regardless of the number of strips available, you’ll need to read each test strip separately to find out which substances are positive and negative.

You can read these tests by finding the control line and test line on the strip. The control line should always be visible next to the letter “C.” If the C line is not there, the test is invalid.

If the C line is there, then find out whether the line next to “T” has appeared. If the T line is there, the test is negative. If the T line isn’t there, the test is positive.

Remember that even the faintest T line indicates a negative test. Any positive tests must be reconfirmed by a lab test.

Saliva Oxycodone Tests

Saliva oxycodone tests come as a kit with a tube and a swab. Performing saliva drug tests can be great because it eliminates the need to use restrooms for testing and is much less messy than handling urine samples.

10-panel saliva drug test includes testing for oxycodone. The subject must refrain from eating or drinking at least ten minutes before the test to get accurate results.

The drug tester will use the swab to sweep the gums, tongue, and cheeks of the test subject’s mouth several times until the swab is completely saturated. There is a saturation indicator on the test swab for ease of use.

Then, the tester will insert the swab into the test tube and screw the top down. Results appear in 10 minutes, but you shouldn’t wait longer than 20 minutes to read them.

Urine Oxycodone Tests

Urine tests come as either individual test strips or drug test cups. Individual test strips are affordable and easy to store in bulk. They allow you to test for one drug at a time, but you must have the subject provide a sample in a regular cup.

Drug test cups are all-in-one tests that do not require your further handling beyond accepting the sample. The drug test cup has test strips built in so that the test begins as soon as urine is collected in the cup. The test subject can screw on the cap so that the urine is contained.

You can test for oxycodone with the 6-panel, 13-panel, 16-panel, and 18-panel drug test cups. These drug test cups also come with built-in temperature strips, helping to deter test subjects from providing false samples.

Oxycodone Results On Other Drug Tests

Many other drug tests check for oxycodone or opioids in conjunction with other substances. You might already have some opioid tests in your inventory, and hope these tests will detect all opioid substances.

To better understand how you can perform a comprehensive drug screening, including detecting oxycodone use, you’ll need to know which drugs cross-react with each other on drug tests.

Does Oxycodone Show Up On A Drug Test For Opiates?

Digging through your drug test supplies, you might find some standard opiate drug tests. These tests are great because you can determine if the subject has used any number of opiates with one test. Unfortunately, oxycodone is not one of them.

While oxycodone reacts with the brain similarly to other opiates, this substance’s molecular structure is too different from other opiates. A standard opiate test can detect morphine, codeine, heroin, and hydrocodone at substantial levels.

To detect oxycodone, the subject will need to have an extremely high amount of the substance in their system to trip the test. The usual opiate test will only alert you to oxycodone use if it is detected at levels of 75,000 ng/mL, which is over 8 times more than the normal level of prescription use.

Can Oxycodone Show Up As Hydrocodone On A Drug Test?

That being said, oxycodone levels would have to be extremely high in the subject’s system, to result in it showing up on an opiate drug test. This opiate drug test can also test for hydrocodone, but it’s highly unlikely for this to happen. Even without that limitation, a study by Pubmed.gov showed that low to moderate levels of opiates is likely undetectable by standard tests.

Oxycodone and hydrocodone are also too dissimilar in molecular structure and create completely different metabolites. While oxycodone creates oxymorphone and noroxymorphone, hydrocodone creates hydromorphone and norhydrocodone.

Drug tests are able to differentiate between these two drugs. If one happens to trip the test of another, results never stop at a urine or saliva test, anyway. Any positive results must be sent to a lab for further testing and confirmation.

As an answer to the question, “Will hydrocodone and oxycodone test the same?” you can rest assured that the answer is no, not likely.

Buy Oxycodone Bulk Drug Tests

Understanding what oxycodone is and how it interacts with different drug tests will help you streamline your drug screening process. You’ll no longer have to ask, “Does oxycodone show up on drug tests?” Instead, you can perform comprehensive and accurate tests for the best results.

For drug testers like yourself who need a steady supply of tests, bulk buying oxycodone drug tests is your best bet. You’ll be able to save money with discounts and bulk deals, and always have a sufficient inventory.

Contact us for our bulk drug test order pricing.

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Which Instant Drug Test Should a Company Use?

When it comes to hiring an employee for their company or corporation, employers today have a lot to think about. They will first determine whether the candidate is qualified for the position and how well they will adapt to their new working environment. Once an employer decides on a specific applicant, he might consider: will this highly qualified individual pass an instant drug test?

Why do companies do drug testing? 

According to the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD), more than 70% of Americans who use illicit drugs work. As a result, an increasing number of entrepreneurs have implemented workplace drug testing programs. This is done to promote employee health and safety, as well as productivity. A company’s bottom line is more likely to increase when its employees are safe, healthy, and productive. 

But which testing method should your business employ?

There are several methods available today, but this article will focus on the critical differences between the two most popular types of instant testing: Urine and Oral. 

 

The Facts About Instant Urine Drug Testing

  • The results of the instant urine drug test are almost instantaneous.
  • They have a long shelf life and are simple to store.
  • The detection of drugs has a three-day window.
  • The accuracy rate is higher than that of oral drug testing.
  • There is no need for a lab analysis.
  • With 98 percent accuracy, it can be determined in 5-10 minutes.
  • The urine sample contains metabolites (the chemical breakdown of the drug or drugs).
  • It is known to be slightly intrusive.
  • Available Chain of Custody.  (A chain of custody is a document that keeps track of the collection procedure, and has each person who has come in contact with the specimen to sign his or her name.)
  • An instant drug test urine cup offers more options. For example, you can use a 5 panel instant drug test or a 10 panel instant drug test, depending upon the number of drugs you want to test.

ovus medical The Facts About Instant Urine Drug Testing

The Truth About Instant Oral Drug Testing.

  • Detection time in instant drug test saliva is reduced.
  • A few hours of drug detection can add up to a full day.
  • THC, which is found in marijuana, is extremely difficult to detect in saliva.
  • Drugs that have been smoked can contaminate the saliva.
  • More expensive than a urine sample, but less reliable.
  • Can detect drugs up to 24 hours before testing and marijuana up to 4-5 hours before testing.
  • Oral swab test is less invasive. You can perform it with several employees in your office
  • Some medications, including Ibuprofen, Motrin, and Advil, can cause false positive drug tests. 

The Great Debate

The most contentious issue when deciding on a type of drug screening is the invasiveness of the procedure. Many businesses struggle with whether to use a test that is more accurate but more invasive on their employees (urine test) or a test that is less accurate but less invasive on their employees (blood test) (oral test). Indeed, the reliability of the instant drug test you are to use plays a huge role.

The bottom line is that if you do require a drug test for employees, accuracy is unquestionably the most important overall goal. Urine testing provides this accuracy at a lower cost and provides a method that, while slightly more invasive, is extremely effective.

It is critical to consider which test is best for and most tailored to your workplace. 

If you want to know more about this topic, visit the Ovus Medical Blog. We have a wealth of information you can learn from. Buy drug tests in bulk.

Buy Drug Tests Here

 

Will Oxycodone Show Up On A Drug Test?

Looking to test for oxycodone in your next round of drug screenings? The wide range of drug tests on the market can be hard to decipher and sift through. When your budget and location limitations come in, the process of finding the right drug test product becomes even more difficult.

To help you find the right drug test product for the substances you’d like to screen for, we’ve put together this guide specifically on oxycodone. In this blog, we’ll answer the question, “Does oxycodone show up on a drug test?” and how to correctly screen for oxycodone use.

Let’s begin.

What Is Oxycodone?

Oxycodone is a substance that interacts with the opioid receptors in the brain. Oxycodone comes from the poppy plant, like other forms of opioids. Prescription oxycodone often comes combined with other pain relievers, such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and acetaminophen.

Medical professionals typically prescribe it as a form of powerful pain relief, but it can be habit-forming and is commonly abused. Using oxycodone for long periods of time can cause users to experience withdrawal symptoms after stopping use.

Those who have recently undergone surgery, serious injury, or trauma might still be legally and responsibly using oxycodone or recently stopped. When choosing to test for oxycodone, it is important to be aware of the test subjects’ prescribed medications.

ovus medical What Does Oxycodone Do In The Body

Does Oxycodone Show Up On Drug Tests?

The short answer is yes, oxycodone shows up on drug tests. To screen properly for oxycodone, however, you’ll need the correct test and technique. Otherwise, you’ll either miss the opportunity to get a positive screening or you’ll invalidate the test.

To check for this substance in a subject’s sample, you’ll need an oxycodone drug test. Oxy drug tests come in a number of different forms, and which one you choose will depend on your budget and needs. You’ll also have to ensure you are testing the subject within a certain window of time after the suspected substance use and follow the exact directions on the test.

What Is OXY On Drug Tests?

To find the right drug test for screening oxycodone use, you’ll need to check for drug tests that list “OXY” as a substance. You can choose to either buy a drug test specifically for oxycodone, or you can buy a multi-drug test that includes OXY in its list of substances.

For How Long Does Oxycodone Show Up On A Drug Test?

When someone uses oxycodone, the substance lingers in their system. Each part of their system can rid the substance over a set period of time, but these periods differ greatly.

For example, oxycodone only stays in the bloodstream for about 24 hours after use. Other parts of the system, however, hold onto this substance for much longer. Saliva can show detection of OXY for 1-4 days, while urine can show detection of OXY for 3-4 days.

What type of test you use will determine the window of time in which you must administer the test. If you get a negative result, it does not necessarily mean that the person has never used oxycodone, but that there isn’t enough in their system to alert the test.

Many biological and environmental factors can also affect how long it takes oxycodone to leave the body. Age, gender, organ function, length of use, and combinations of other substances can affect the body’s ability to flush out oxycodone.

How to Test for Oxycodone

The most standard forms of tests for oxycodone are urine tests and saliva tests. Saliva tests come as swabs while urine tests can come as either test cups or test strips. Both saliva and urine samples can help detect oxycodone use for a few days after the last use.

Both tests utilize a control line and test line function. Regardless of the number of strips available, you’ll need to read each test strip separately to find out which substances are positive and negative.

You can read these tests by finding the control line and test line on the strip. The control line should always be visible next to the letter “C.” If the C line is not there, the test is invalid.

If the C line is there, then find out whether the line next to “T” has appeared. If the T line is there, the test is negative. If the T line isn’t there, the test is positive.

Remember that even the faintest T line indicates a negative test. Any positive tests must be reconfirmed by a lab test.

Saliva Oxycodone Tests

Saliva oxycodone tests come as a kit with a tube and a swab. Performing saliva drug tests can be great because it eliminates the need to use restrooms for testing and is much less messy than handling urine samples.

10-panel saliva drug test includes testing for oxycodone. The subject must refrain from eating or drinking at least ten minutes before the test to get accurate results.

The drug tester will use the swab to sweep the gums, tongue, and cheeks of the test subject’s mouth several times until the swab is completely saturated. There is a saturation indicator on the test swab for ease of use.

Then, the tester will insert the swab into the test tube and screw the top down. Results appear in 10 minutes, but you shouldn’t wait longer than 20 minutes to read them.

Urine Oxycodone Tests

Urine tests come as either individual test strips or drug test cups. Individual test strips are affordable and easy to store in bulk. They allow you to test for one drug at a time, but you must have the subject provide a sample in a regular cup.

Drug test cups are all-in-one tests that do not require your further handling beyond accepting the sample. The drug test cup has test strips built in so that the test begins as soon as urine is collected in the cup. The test subject can screw on the cap so that the urine is contained.

You can test for oxycodone with the 6-panel, 13-panel, 16-panel, and 18-panel drug test cups. These drug test cups also come with built-in temperature strips, helping to deter test subjects from providing false samples.

ovus medical drug test products

Oxycodone Results On Other Drug Tests

Many other drug tests check for oxycodone or opioids in conjunction with other substances. You might already have some opioid tests in your inventory, and hope these tests will detect all opioid substances.

To better understand how you can perform a comprehensive drug screening, including detecting oxycodone use, you’ll need to know which drugs cross-react with each other on drug tests.

Does Oxycodone Show Up On A Drug Test For Opiates?

Digging through your drug test supplies, you might find some standard opiate drug tests. These tests are great because you can determine if the subject has used any number of opiates with one test. Unfortunately, oxycodone is not one of them.

While oxycodone reacts with the brain similarly to other opiates, this substance’s molecular structure is too different from other opiates. A standard opiate test can detect morphine, codeine, heroin, and hydrocodone at substantial levels.

To detect oxycodone, the subject will need to have an extremely high amount of the substance in their system to trip the test. The usual opiate test will only alert you to oxycodone use if it is detected at levels of 75,000 ng/mL, which is over 8 times more than the normal level of prescription use.

Can Oxycodone Show Up As Hydrocodone On A Drug Test?

That being said, oxycodone levels would have to be extremely high in the subject’s system, to result in it showing up on an opiate drug test. This opiate drug test can also test for hydrocodone, but it’s highly unlikely for this to happen. Even without that limitation, a study by Pubmed.gov showed that low to moderate levels of opiates is likely undetectable by standard tests.

Oxycodone and hydrocodone are also too dissimilar in molecular structure and create completely different metabolites. While oxycodone creates oxymorphone and noroxymorphone, hydrocodone creates hydromorphone and norhydrocodone.

Drug tests are able to differentiate between these two drugs. If one happens to trip the test of another, results never stop at a urine or saliva test, anyway. Any positive results must be sent to a lab for further testing and confirmation.

As an answer to the question, “Will hydrocodone and oxycodone test the same?” you can rest assured that the answer is no, not likely.

Buy Oxycodone Bulk Drug Tests

Understanding what oxycodone is and how it interacts with different drug tests will help you streamline your drug screening process. You’ll no longer have to ask, “Does oxycodone show up on drug tests?” Instead, you can perform comprehensive and accurate tests for the best results.

For drug testers like yourself who need a steady supply of tests, bulk buying oxycodone drug tests is your best bet. You’ll be able to save money with discounts and bulk deals, and always have a sufficient inventory.

Contact us for our bulk drug test order pricing.

Buy OXY Strips Here

How Do Drug Tests Work?

In the United States, around 71% of workplaces with over 1,000 employees conduct drug tests, and 42% test for alcohol misuse. Worksites with 50 to 99 employees also test for drugs 40.2% of the time.

Employee drug testing is common and often the same as at-home drug testing. How do at-home drug tests work? How do drug tests work in general?

Even if the reasoning for drug testing is different, it is not a factor in how drug testing works. Instead, factors include the type of drug test, chosen sample, and drugs tested for.

Keep reading to learn everything you need to know.

What Is Drug Screening?

Drug screening, or drug testing, is a process that screens for prior or current drug use. Testees will provide a sample to be tested, commonly urine or saliva.

With these samples, the process will conclude whether certain substances or chemicals are present in the body. When a substance is detected, the test is positive, and vice versa, the test is not detected.

Drug screening is common for employers, treatment centers, pain clinics, drug rehabilitation centers, etc. The accuracy of a drug test will depend on several factors, including the test used and the substance tested.

So, how do drug tests work? The specific process depends on the type of drug test and what sample is used.

How Does a Urine Drug Test Work?

A urine drug test, also known as a urinalysis, will test for recent or current drug use. With one urine sample, urinalysis can accurately test for different substances.

A urine test has a different detection window than certain tests. However, marijuana is often detectable in urine testing for a month or longer in heavy users.

Although the shorter detection window might seem like a setback, a urine drug test is commonly used for a variety of reasons. In legal instances, a urine test is known to be more accurate than others.

How Do Mouth Drug Tests Work?

A mouth drug test uses saliva to test for substances. While urine tests range from drug test cups, urine strips, and urine dip cards, a saliva drug test uses an oral swab.

Depending on the drug, a saliva test may offer a longer window of detection.

Drug Test Inaccuracy

Drug tests are reasonably accurate. If you purchase drug tests in bulk from a reputable company, you can benefit from 99% accuracy rates.

However, some situations can lead to an inaccurate drug test. The following things might cause a false positive test result:

  • Secondhand marijuana smoke
  • Weight loss pills
  • Poppy seeds
  • Mouthwash
  • Certain medications (antidepressants, antibiotics, antipsychotic drugs, antihistamines, etc.)
  • CBD oil
  • HIV medication
  • Coca tea

A drug test might come up as inconclusive if the testing sample was tampered with. This is most common with urine drug tests, which makes saliva drug testing a great option.

An inconclusive result could be from a diluted sample. Although this might mean that the urine sample was diluted purposely, sometimes a high water intake before the test can cause this as well.

Types of Drug Tests

Now, let’s get into the specifics of how a drug test works depending on the type of test used. Once you have a better idea of each, you can decide which is best for your reason for testing.

vus medical ovus medical how do drug tests work_

Cup for Urine Drug Testing

The best drug test is one that tests for multiple substances with one urine sample. Panel drug test cups range from testing 6 substances to 18. You can find 6, 8, 10, 12, 13, 14, 16, and 18 panel drug test cups at Ovus Medical.

These drug testing kits lead to accurate results within minutes. They are ideal for testing in the workplace, treatment centers, schools, and testing labs.

So, how do drug tests work for jobs and other circumstances? These are the steps:

  1. Remove the cup from the sealed pouch.
  1. Write the donor’s information on the cup.
  1. Have the donor provide a urine sample in the cup and close the cap.
  1. Start a timer for 5 minutes.
  1. Remove the label to show substance abbreviations.
  1. Read the results after 5 minutes.

A test with a positive result should be confirmed through another drug testing method, so sending it to a lab for confirmation is recommended. Don’t interpret results after 8 minutes, as they will be invalid.

Drug test cups come with temperature strip labels so that you can test the urine for the correct range. You’ll notice a green color when the temperature is ready. The proper range for adult urine is between 90 and 100 degrees F.

Cup for Drug Testing with Six Panels

A panel urine drug test cup can test for multiple substances and might differ depending on the number of panels. Let’s start with the 6 panel drug test cup. Here are the substances tested:

  • Amphetamine (AMP)
  • Oxycodone (OXY)
  • Benzodiazepines (BZO)
  • Buprenorphine (BUP)
  • Cocaine (COC)
  • Opiates and Morphine (OPI/MOR)

There is also a six-panel urine drug test cup with THC that tests for the following six substances:

  • Amphetamine (AMP)
  • Opiates and Morphine (OPI/MOR)
  • Ecstasy (MDMA)
  • Cocaine (COC)
  • Oxycodone (OXY)
  • Marijuana (THC)

Depending on what you need to test for, one of the 6 panel tests might be more beneficial than the other.

8-Panel Drug Test Cup and Beyond

There is also an 8-panel drug test cup that tests for the following substances:

  • Amphetamine (AMP)
  • Barbiturates (BAR)
  • Buprenorphine (BUP)
  • Cocaine (COC)
  • Marijuana (THC)
  • Methamphetamine (MET)
  • Opiates (OPI)
  • Oxycodone (OXY)

10 panel drug test cup tests for the same substances as the 8 panel drug test plus ecstasy (MDMA) and methadone (MET).

Like the 6 panel drug test, there are different substances spread across three different 12 panel drug test cups.

The first 12-panel drug test tests for the same substances as the 10 panel drug test plus benzodiazepine (BZO) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCA). It also tests for three adulterants: creatinine, specific gravity, and pH.

In the 12-panel drug test with PCP, the same drugs are tested for except tricyclic antidepressants (TCA) and adulterants. Instead, the test includes phencyclidine (PCP).

The last 12-panel test offered is the same as the first one but doesn’t test for adulterants. The 13-panel drug screen includes adulterants or fentanyl (FYL) depending on which test cup you choose.

The 14-panel drug test cup tests for the same drugs plus fentanyl (FYL) and hCG, which is used to detect pregnancy. If you don’t need to test for pregnancy, you can opt for the 14-panel drug test that tests for alcohol use through EtG instead.

16-panel drug test cup tests for these substances:

  • Amphetamine (AMP)
  • Barbiturate (BAR)
  • Benzodiazepine (BZO)
  • Buprenorphine (BUP)
  • Cocaine (COC)
  • Ecstasy (MDMA)
  • Ethyl Glucuronide (EtG)
  • Fentanyl (FYL)
  • Kratom (KRA)
  • Marijuana (THC)
  • Methadone (MTD)
  • Methamphetamine (MET)
  • Opiates (OPI/MOR)
  • Oxycodone (OXY)
  • Phencyclidine (PCP)
  • Tricyclic antidepressants (TCA)

On the Ovus Medical website, you can get a better idea of the substances tested and the cutoff levels for each.

Urine Drug Test Strips

Unlike urine drug test cups, a urine test strip will only test for one substance per strip. The substances tested through this drug screening from Ovus Medical range from the following:

  • Fentanyl (FYL)
  • Ethyl glucuronide (EtG)
  • Kratom (KRA)
  • Benzodiazepines (BZO)
  • Oxycodone (OXY)
  • Opiates (OPI)
  • Cocaine (COC)
  • Buprenorphine (BUP)
  • Tricyclic antidepressants (TCA)
  • Marijuana (THC)
  • Tramadol (TRA)
  • Amphetamine (AMP)
  • Methamphetamine (MET)

These are some of the most common tests, but you can find urine drug test strips for Ritalin, heroin, ketamine, and hydrocodone, among others. You can also find test strips to learn more about pregnancy and nicotine use as well.

Now that you know the types of drug test strips, how do they work? The instructions are as follows:

  • Have the donor take a urine sample.
  • Remove the urine test strip from the pouch.
  • Immerse the strip in the urine with the arrow pointing down.
  • Take the strip out after 15 seconds.
  • Lay it on a flat and non-absorbent surface.
  • Read the results after 5 minutes.

These affordable testing strips are easy to use and provide 99% accuracy.

Urine Dip Cards

Urine testing dip cards are another multi-screen drug test option with 3, 4, 5, 10, 12, and 13 panels. Here’s how to use them:

  1. Obtain a urine sample from the donor
  1. Dip the pad area of the dipstick into the urine sample.
  1. Submerge only up to the “MAX” line.
  1. Confirm results after 5 minutes.

It’s important to note that with this type of test, negative results might be displayed within 3 minutes. You should only seek confirmation of positive results after 5 minutes.

Results read after 10 minutes are invalid. These tests have highly sensitive detection cutoff levels and a long shelf life, so you can benefit from bulk wholesale prices.

The substances tested with this type of test are among the same ones tested through drug test cups.

Mouth Swabs for Saliva Drug Testing

The oral swab drug test uses a saliva sample rather than a urine sample to detect substances in the body. At Ovus Medical, the saliva drug test swab has 10 panels that test for the following:

  • Amphetamine
  • Methamphetamine
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Cocaine
  • Oxycodone
  • Buprenorphine
  • Ecstasy
  • Cannabinoid
  • Barbiturates
  • Phencyclidine

The different substances are color-coded so that the results can be easily identified. It’s nearly impossible to adulterate a saliva drug test, so false negatives or invalid results caused by this are uncommon.

ovus medical Saliva Test Results

Plus, oral swab drug tests are a less invasive option when compared to urine drug tests. They also have a 99% accuracy rate.

Before testing, make sure the donor avoids eating, drinking, and chewing gum or tobacco for 10 minutes prior to the test. The swab should be brought to room temperature before using it, but the stick and test tube should be kept in their packaging until the test.

Here’s how this test works:

  1. Use the sponge end of the stick to collect saliva from the inner cheek for 3 to 5 minutes.
  1. Ensure the swab is soaked with saliva.
  1. Insert the collection stick vertically into the test tube.
  1. Close the test tube by pressing the lid down.
  1. Keep the test tube in a vertical position.
  1. Read results after 10 minutes of closing the test tube lid.

Results for this type of test should not be read after one hour.

Donors should not bite, chew, or suck on the sponge part of the collection stick. The saturation indicator strip will change color when you have had the swab in your mouth for long enough.

Test Result Interpretation

For all four of the above drug tests, interpreting the test results will be the same process. If the specimen, urine or saliva, contains more than the predetermined cutoff levels, the result is positive.

Keep in mind that the panel drug tests will have multiple testing zones that you’ll have to interpret, while the test strip only has one.

Each test will have a control (C) region and a test (T) region. When one colored band shows up in the control region but not in the test region, the test is positive.

A test result that includes two colored bands, one in the control region and the other in the test region, is negative.

A colored band should always appear in the control region. If a colored band fails to pop up in either region or only shows up in the test region, the test is invalid. For accurate results, you’ll have to take the test again.

This problem should not persist, but if it does, you can reach out to your local distributor for guidance.

Remember, a positive test should be sent to a toxicology laboratory to confirm the results.

How Do Drug Tests Work? Your questions explained

After explaining the answer to “how do drug tests work?”, you should have a better idea of the process. Depending on the drug test you use, testing will be different, but all results are interpreted in the same way.

When you use Ovus Medical as your drug test distributor, you’ll have access to all of the above drug tests. For those who need at-home drug testing kits, small order options are available.

For medical facilities, we recommend taking advantage of bulk testing orders at wholesale pricing. Contact us today to start an order or receive two free sample cups.

Urine Drug Test Color Chart: A Guide

Whether you’re new to drug testing or this is the first time you’re incorporating urine tests into your process, reading the results can be difficult. Urine drug tests can come with a range of abilities, testing anywhere from one to several different drugs, each one using its own stick. If that’s not complicated enough, different tests can also have unique ways to read the results.

To quickly get started with incorporating urine drug tests into your testing process, it helps to have a solid understanding of how these tests work and how to read them. A great way to quickly learn is to use a urine drug test color chart for reference.

In order to support testers and their efforts, we’ve created a brief guide with a drug urine test color chart complete with explanations on what drug test colors mean. We’ll also talk about C and T on drug tests so you can achieve accurate results.

How to Read a Drug Test

Reading and understanding drug test results can be difficult at first. Once you understand how the test works and start memorizing the colors, you’ll become an expert.

The first most important aspect of reading drug tests is to understand what C and T mean on a drug test strip. No matter what colors and results you get on a drug test, the results will be invalid if C and T are not read properly.

In short, “C” stands for “control.” As with all experiments and tests, having a control result is crucial for comparing against the test. A control must always be the same so that the test result can be compared to it accurately.

The letter “T” represents the test result. Drug test strips will have a “C” and “T” section on them. If the “C” result is valid, then the “T” section in the urine drug test results can be read accurately.

For a drug test to be valid, the control section must always have a line present once you conduct the test. If a line appears in the test section but not the control section, the test is not valid.

What Causes the T Line to Appear?

Drug tests have set cutoff levels for substances that determine whether the test is positive or negative. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMSHA) recommends certain cutoff levels for specific drugs to reduce the number of false positives or positive tests for trace amounts.

Drug testers such as law enforcement have zero-tolerance policies. These agencies typically use tests with much lower cutoff levels in order to test for drug use at any level.

Overall, the subject must have a certain level of drug present in their sample in order to trip the T line. As a result, drug test producers have recommendations for the time period in which you should administer these tests after suspected drug use for best results.

What Does a Negative Drug Test Look Like?

Negative drug screen results happen in two situations. If a drug test has no control line, then you must consider it negative. If it has a control line and a test line, then the drug test is negative.

What Does a Positive Drug Test Look Like?

A drug test is positive when the control line appears, but the test line does not appear. The test line does not appear when the concentration of the drug in the urine is higher than the cutoff level for that test.

Drug Urine Test Color Chart

The second most important part of reading drug test results is to know which colors mean which substances are present. When you are testing for a wide range of substances, it can be difficult to keep these color codes straight, slowing down your drug screening process.

Drug test colors are not the same across all manufacturers. Some drug tests use very different colors, while others are a bit harder to read.

The best course of action is to use the instructions from the drug testing kit you’ve purchased and follow the color code provided. Thankfully, drug test strip colors are usually also labeled with the name of the substance on the package.

Color Code for Sample Validity

Ovus Medical also provide adulteration strips, which confirm the validity of the urine sample. These strips ensure that the test subject provides a fresh sample of their own urine for the test.

These adulteration strips check for creatinine, nitrite, glutaraldehyde, specific gravity, and oxidants. Abnormal levels of these factors can cause inaccurate test results.

So, what does the color blue mean on a drug test? Oxidants will result in a color range from white to dark blue. The darker the blue, the higher the level of oxidants in the sample.

Specific gravity results will range from dark green to a mustard yellow. If the result is on one of those extreme ends, it is abnormal. A normal result will be somewhere in the middle of greenish yellow.

Checking the pH is important, too, and results can range from dark brown to light pinks and oranges. The best result is a beigey orange color, not pink or dark brown.

For nitrite, an abnormal result is red. The normal result is white or light pink. For glutaraldehyde, a negative result is a deep pinkish purple, while an abnormal result is dark purple or light purple.

Finally, creatinine should result in a dark to medium brown, not a light tan color.

Why Are the Control and Test Lines Different Colors?

When you ask a subject to take a urine drug test, the control and test lines might appear as different colors. The control line might be a solid red while the test line is a faded pink. It’s important to remember that any line that shows up in the test section, regardless of color, indicates a negative test.

So why is the test line pink and the control line red? Faded test lines can either be the result of an inaccurately used test or environmental factors. Factors that can affect the line color are:

  • Urine dilution
  • The sample sitting too long before testing or reading results
  • Insufficient sample
  • Humidity or temperature of the room
  • Age of the test

There are some legal, prescription drugs that can cause cross-reactivity as well. Positive drug tests must always undergo secondary testing at a lab to confirm the results. You can cross-check the substance showing up positive against a chart of reactive drugs that could cause a positive test.

In some cases, it’s true that having only a trace amount of a substance can trigger the test line to only fade slightly. You might be suspicious that the test subject has used, but they don’t have enough in their system to trigger the cutoff. You are not allowed, however, to consider this a positive test result.

Accurate Urine Drug Testing

With your handy urine drug test color chart and knowledge of how to read a test correctly, you’ll be able to quickly cross reference drug test results with the assigned substances. As a result, your drug testing process will go smoothly and quickly.

Ovus Medical offers top-notch drug tests of all kinds to drug testing professionals. All products are CLIA Waived, FDA approved, and easy to use. Buy in bulk. You can even ask for sample cups!

Contact us today to get started on your bulk order.

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Does Oxycodone Show Up on a Drug Test?

Oxy is the abbreviation of oxycodone, a medication for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. Doctors prescribe it when other medications and treatments are ineffective. It comes from thebaine, an opium alkaloid. The question is – does oxycodone show up on a drug test?

This powerful drug has twice the effect of morphine and would cause more addiction than other opiates such as codeine. Taking too much of this illicit drug can lead to misuse, overdose, and death.

How long does oxycodone show up on a drug test?

Oxycodone has a half-life of 3-5 hours. This means that after three hours or so, half of the dose will be eliminated from the bloodstream.

But what if your boss announces a random drug test? And because you are on an oxycodone prescription, you just took it a few hours ago. Will it show up on a drug test?

There are two factors that affect oxycodone’s detectability on a drug test.  

First, you have to consider the type of test used. In a urine test, Oxycodone can be detected within 1-4 days, and a person who has taken it within 1-3 hours will test positive. In saliva, Oxy can be detected within minutes of taking it and can be detected on a test for up to 48 hours.

The second thing to consider is a person’s state of health, age, weight, diet, and gender, along with his frequency of use and the amount of oxy he ingested. 

oxycodone


What can cause a false positive for Oxycodone?

In a urine sample, he presence of hydrocodone can result in a false positive test result in an oxycodone screening test. However, positive immunoassay results should be regarded as presumptive. The result will be confirmed by GC/MS if the client requests it. 

Does oxycodone show up on a drug test for opiates?

This will depend on the type of drug test, according to a PubMed.gov study. Urine samples containing low to moderate concentrations of hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone, and oxycodone will likely go undetected when tested by conventional immunoassays. 

Can oxycodone show up as hydrocodone on a drug test?

No, oxy can’t show up as hydrocodone on a drug test. It’s because once ingested, these drugs metabolize differently. Oxycodone’s primary metabolites are oxymorphone and noroxymorphone. On the other hand, hydromorphone and norhydrocodone are the primary metabolites of hydrocodone.

Can you mix alcohol and oxycodone?

The combination of alcohol and oxycodone is extremely dangerous. Both medications act as central nervous system depressants. Alcohol, like opioids, causes a person’s breathing to slow down. When the body tries to fight the effects of both drugs, the respiratory system may become overburdened. Combining alcohol and oxycodone is likely to result in respiratory depression, which is characterized by minimal or no breathing. 

Can you take Oxycodone with Ibuprofen?

Combining the opioid Oxycodone with Ibuprofen won’t work. In one study, experts compared a single-dose of Ibuprofen with Ibuprofen combined with various doses of Oxycodone. Only the 10 mg oxycodone combination outperformed the others after two hours; there was no difference in pain between groups after 3-6 hours. Those who took Oxycodone, on the other hand, experienced more nausea, vomiting, and drowsiness. 

So, does oxycodone show up on a drug test? Yes, it can, depending on the factors stated above.

Do you need to buy a bulk drug test for oxycodone? Check out the Ovus Medical Store. We have a wide variety of drug test for all your types of needs.

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Drug Tests and Their Detection Times

Drug tests are commonplace today. Many employers, court systems, athletic leagues / organizations, or even medical insurance companies may require people to take drug tests. There are, however, different types of drug tests designed to check for different illicit drugs or narcotics. Some tests are more sensitive than others and can detect the presence of a certain type of drug for a longer period of time. Certain drugs remain detectable in the body for months, while others may only be detectable for days. Here, we’ll explore different drug test detection times for various types of drugs and test types.

Why Do Some Drugs Stay in Your System Longer Than Others?

There are different reasons why some drugs stay in the system for a longer period of time than others. The main factor determining this time frame is the type of drug in question. Typically, drugs that are smoked leave the body more quickly than drugs that are ingested. Other key factors that affect the length of time a drug will remain in the body include:

  • Amount of drug used and frequency of the drug’s use
  • The drug’s half life
  • Body mass and weight
  • Physical fitness level
  • Metabolic rate
  • Gender
  • Medical conditions (some conditions may delay the drug’s elimination from the body)
  • Hydration level

There isn’t any way to predict with certainty how long a drug will stay in the body. Even considering average times that drugs are typically eliminated from people using them, there’s no way for an individual to know if the drug they’re using will be eliminated quickly or slowly at any given time. The times that drugs remain in the system are highly variable–and the tests used to detect them also vary.

What Are the Different Types of Drug Tests?

There are many different kinds of drug tests today. These tests include urine, blood, hair, saliva, and perspiration. The goal of the drug testing may inform which type of test is chosen.

Urine Drug Testing

Urine tests are the most commonplace because they are affordable, easy to administer and take, and produce fast results. In most cases, urine will detect a drug’s presence if it was used in the last few days, but as with all tests, urine drug test times vary according to many different factors.

Hair Drug Testing

Drug testing using hair is extremely effective and accurate. A hair test can generally determine if a person has used most types of drugs for up to 90 days, and in some cases, even longer. Hair follicle testing, however, tends to be substantially more expensive than other drug tests and has a long turn-around time as it must be sent to a laboratory.

Saliva Drug Testing

A mouth swab test or saliva test can detect the presence of cannabis, opioids, and other substances. Saliva drug test detection times vary depending on the factors we discussed above. Some agencies prefer saliva tests to urine tests because they’re easier to administer and there is less risk for cheating on the test. Some law enforcement groups prefer swab tests for roadside administration over other types of drug testing.

Perspiration Drug Testing

Perspiration or sweat patch drug testing is most frequently used in drug-associated court cases. This type of testing is used for continuous monitoring for a period of time such as 14 days. The tests are accurate and cannot be ‘diluted’. They are also very secure. Testing staff can detect if the patch has been tampered with and will note the results as such with an automatic refusal. Once the testing has been completed, these tests usually return results in less than three days.

Blood Drug Testing

While other tests look for drug metabolites, blood drug tests look for parent compounds of drugs. These tests offer only a short window of time for testing. In fact, blood tests can only test for compounds within minutes to hours of their use. These tests are commonly used at accident sites to determine if individuals were driving or operating equipment while under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Although drug testing involves a short window of time, the tests are very accurate.

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Other Types of Drug Tests

Today, there are many different types of drug tests available for employers, medical organizations, or other agencies who have drug testing requirements. For instance, you may see products such as 12 panel drug tests or 10 panel drug tests. These tests typically involve urine testing and contain all the items needed to conduct the test in kit form. They test for 10 or 12 components in order to determine the presence of drugs such as marijuana, barbiturates, cocaine, opioids, etc…

Testing for Specific Drugs

Here, we’ll outline some of the most commonly abused drugs and how long they’re likely to remain in the body. We’ll also provide some ranges for drug testing times, which again, will vary depending on the drug and the test.

Marijuana Drug Testing

Millions of Americans use marijuana, some medicinally and many recreationally. Although marijuana is legal in many places today, it is still not legal in all states. Moreover, many employers still prohibit its use and will test employees to ensure that they are not using the drug.

The testing time frame for marijuana is dependent on the factors we discussed above. The following times are merely a guide for drug testing times:

Marijuana urine testing: 1-30 days
Marijuana saliva drug testing: up to 3 days
Marijuana blood testing: up to 4 hours
Marijuana hair test: 1-90 days

These drug test times for marijuana are related to natural cannabis. Drug testing time frames for synthetic marijuana drugs like K2 will produce different average result times. For instance, synthetic marijuana can be detected in the blood for a much longer period of time–up to 48 hours as opposed to natural cannabis which can generally only be detected in less than 4 hours.

Heroin Drug Testing

Heroin is an illicit drug that is not legal for use in any states and has no medicinal value. Heroin is synthesized from the drug morphine and is highly addictive and dangerous. In 2019, more than 14,000 people died from a drug overdose involving heroin. Many agencies or employers routinely test for heroin use. Heroin drug testing times are as follows:

Urine: 1-3 days
Hair: up to 3 months
Blood: up to 6 hours
Saliva: up to 60 minutes

Drug Testing for Other Opioids

Heroin isn’t the only opioid drug of abuse. Many people abuse prescription narcotics, which are drugs like fentanyl, morphine, or codeine. These drugs can leave an individual drowsy and with reduced functions. Driving or operating equipment when under the influence of these drugs can be extremely dangerous. Moreover, people who abuse these opioids may be less than productive in the workplace.

There are many opioids; we’ll include some drug testing times for the most common opioid drugs of abuse.

Fentanyl:

Urine: 1-3 days
Hair : up to 3 months
Blood: up to 48 hours

Morphine:

Urine: 1-2 days
Hair: up to 3 months
Blood: 1-3 days

Oxycodone:

Urine: 1-4 days
Hair: up to 3 months
Blood: 1-24 hours

Hallucinogen Drug Testing

Hallucinogenic drugs cause people to see or hear things that are not real. Some hallucinogens are found naturally in items like mushrooms. Others are made from chemicals. Also referred to as psychedelic drugs, these chemicals change a person’s perception of reality. Drug testing times for these drugs vary depending on the hallucinogen in question; here are a few of the most common hallucinogen testing times:

LSD:

Urine: 1-4 days
Hair: up to 90 days
Blood: 1-12 hours

Magic Mushrooms (Psilocybin):

Urine: 1-24 hours
Hair: up to 3 months
Blood: 1-24 hours

PCP:

Urine: up to 4 weeks
Hair: up to 3 months
Blood: 1-24 hours

Stimulant Drug Testing

Stimulants like cocaine and methamphetamine are illegal but commonly abused drugs. These drugs involve both dangerous short and long-term effects. Like the other classes of drugs, each type of stimulant may involve different average time frames for testing to determine their presence in the body. Some of the most commonly abused stimulants and their drug testing times are:

Cocaine:

Urine: 1-4 days
Hair: up to 3 months
Blood: 1-24 hours

Methamphetamine:

Urine: up to 7 days
Hair: up to 3 months
Blood: 1-3 days

More Information about Drug Testing

Drug tests can also test for the presence of drugs like barbiturates or other commonly abused drugs like Ecstasy, which is chemically similar to both stimulants and hallucinogenic drugs. Drug tests may also test for alcohol. When selecting a drug test for use, courts and employers will factor in these drug test time frames to their decisions. Other factors like the tests’ cost and accuracy are also typically considered.

Buy Drug Tests Here

If you are searching for 12 panel drug tests or 10 panel drug tests for your organization, you can purchase high-quality drug testing kits and supplies like these at Ovus Medical. Peruse the company’s website to find the drug testing kits and supplies you need.

What Major Companies Drug Test in the USA?

Recent surveys show that more than half (56%) of U.S. employers use drug tests on a regular basis. Are you curious about what jobs drug test in America?

If so, then you’ve come to the right place.

Many use drug tests for pre-employment purposes. Others use a random testing method to ensure employee compliance. There are a whole host of benefits of testing employees, which is why so many employers do.

Read on to learn more about what employers drug test employees in the US.

ovus medical what major companies drug test in USA


1. Amazon

When wondering what companies drug test, Amazon has to be at the top of most people’s lists. That’s because the uber-giant Amazon employs a massive number of Americans. Statistics say that one out of every 153 American workers is an Amazon employee!

Amazon does drug test employees about once a month. They use saliva tests. Are you wondering — what do companies drug test for? Amazon tests for:

  • Marijuana
  • Cocaine
  • Opioids
  • Amphetamines
  • MDMA

Amazon employs many different workers. What jobs require drug testing varies. For instance, at-home project managers don’t submit to testing. Factory workers do, though.

2. Apple

Apple is one of the biggest job creators in the US. To get employed, workers must submit to a urine test and then random saliva tests (which are rare).

If you’re wondering what is a drug test in the USA like, then you’re about to find out! The urine tests ask you to urinate in a cup, which gets sent off to a lab. The saliva test swabs the inside of your mouth before getting sent off.

3. Google

Google is another major employer in the USA.

You may wonder — what panel drug test do most companies use? The most common tests are 5-panel or 10-panel urine drug tests. Google uses the standard 5-panel test.

4. Waffle House

Waffle House is an iconic US restaurant. What might come as a shock, though, is that they extensively drug test employees.

Urine tests are necessary for pre-employment and random purposes. Waffle House tests for a host of drugs including propoxyphene, Quaaludes, and methadone. They also test for PCP, benznidazole, and MDA.

5. Domino’s

If you drive for a progression, then there’s a good chance you’ll get tested.

As a pizza delivery person at Domino’s, you’ll get regular urine tests. They use a traditional 5-panel test.

What Jobs Drug Test As a Requirement?

If you were curious about what jobs drug test, then you now know the answer. The list above isn’t comprehensive, though. Employers have a legal right to ask you to submit to a drug test for job purposes.

Not all employers do, but many want to for worker’s compensation purposes or need to by law. If you’re an employee, you may wonder — can you order a drug test for yourself? You can! Doing so can ensure that your employer’s results will be what you’re expecting.

If you’re an employer who wants to start testing, then you’ll need stock in bulk. Check out our awesome discount bundles to help you achieve your drug testing goals.

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Is a Saliva or Urine Drug Test More Accurate?

A saliva or urine drug test is ideal for many different drug testing applications, from pre-employment testing to probation drug testing, clinical laboratory testing, and more. Aside from that, these drug tests are CLIA-waived and FDA-approved. So is a saliva or urine drug test more accurate? Read on to find out.

Difference between saliva and urine drug tests

The urine drug test remains the most preferred onsite testing method today. However, the saliva drug test remains a reliable option as well. Choosing the correct type of drug test depends upon the nature of the workforce and the legal outcome required.

If a workplace prefers a lower risk of false negative results due to any adulteration in a sample, urine drug tests would be the better choice. The reason is that it can detect any dilutions in the urine sample during the testing process.

On the other hand, a workplace subject to industrial relations pressure or needs convenient testing may consider saliva testing. Unlike urine, there is a shorter detection window for drug use in saliva testing.

It is important to remember that saliva testing measures the presence of a drug, not the quantity consumed or level of intoxication. In contrast, urine testing measures the presence of metabolites associated with drug abuse.

Saliva or urine drug tests are more accurate

Today’s industries prefer rapid drug test kits that provide accurate test results while having a short detection period to make drug testing more effective. The most popular drug tests today are saliva and urine tests.

The saliva and urine drug tests come with reliable, accurate, CLIA-waived, and FDA approved testing kits designed to be easy to use. Also, multiple drugs are detected simultaneously in under 10 minutes with 99% accuracy with both drug tests method.

Moreover, these drug testing supplies meet strict guidelines set by regulatory agencies such as the FDA, CLIA, and SAMHSA. In addition, lower cut-off levels make these drug tests the best option for drug screening and pain management.

ovus medical Urine vs. Saliva Drug Testing

How reliable are saliva drug tests?

The saliva or oral swab drug test is a fast and effective oral fluids test suitable for drug detection in the workplace, custody evaluations, and rehabilitation assessment. After recent drug use, this drug test can detect the presence of illicit substances in the body for 24-72 hours.

Furthermore, a saliva drug test is a less invasive alternative to a urine drug test. In as little as 10 minutes, this test provides a result that is 99% accurate without the need for private restrooms. Also, this test is nearly impossible to adulterate to obtain a false negative.

Oral swab test is a cheaper alternative that detects legal and illicit drugs simultaneously with just a single test. By using a fluid specimen, it can quickly identify the presence of any drug combination. Included are the following drug of abuse substances:

  • Amphetamine (AMP)
  • Methamphetamine (MET)
  • Benzodiazepines (BZO)
  • Cocaine (COC)
  • Oxycodone (OXY)
  • Buprenorphine (BUP)
  • Ecstasy (MDMA)
  • Cannabinoid (THC)
  • Barbiturates (BAR)
  • Phencyclidine (PCP)
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How reliable are urine drug tests?

A urine drug test provides accurate results while being convenient and quick. This test offers easy-to-read results in less than 5 minutes. Also, manufacturers made the urine testing kit mess-free, with a screw-top cover designed to prevent drips and improve security.

A urine drug screening is simple enough to test at home or in the workplace. And to confirm that a person’s pee is valid and free from any contamination, each cup comes with a built-in temperature strip to check if urine temperature is within the normal range.

More importantly, urine drug testing is a reliable, accurate, and affordable method used by companies, institutes, schools, government facilities, and similar organizations. It can also detect multiple drugs at the same time. Among the drugs it can detect but are not limited to:

  • Amphetamine (AMP)
  • Barbiturates (BAR)
  • Benzodiazepine (BZO)
  • Buprenorphine (BUP)
  • Cocaine (COC)
  • Ecstasy (MDMA)
  • Marijuana (THC)
  • Methadone (MTD)
  • Methamphetamine (MET)
  • Opiates (OPI/MOR)
  • Oxycodone (OXY)
  • Tricyclic Antidepressants (TCA)
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Where to buy the best saliva or urine drug test in bulk?

The fastest and most convenient way to get the best saliva or urine drug test is to order directly from Ovus Medical. They provide bulk saliva or urine drug tests as well as single-use home tests at very low prices. It’s quick, simple, and convenient to use!

Looking for 99% accurate, CLIA-waived, FDA-approved saliva or urine drug test kits? Check out Ovus Medical’s oral swabs and panel test cups now!

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What Are Drug Test Detection Times?

Are you an employer wanting to test your staff or new hires? Maybe you’re a parent who needs to test their child for drug abuse or a treatment center looking to test patients. If you are one of these, then this article is for you.

Keep reading to find out all you need to know about drug test detection times. We’ll discuss which drugs these tests can detect, how long the screening takes, as well as how to use a drug testing kit.

Who Uses Drug Tests?

There are many people who could have a use for a drug screening test. Some of the most common are:

  • doctors
  • employers
  • treatment centers
  • sporting events

Types of Urine Tests

There are two main types of urine tests, and both of these will require a urine sample from the patient.

The most common type is an immunoassay (IA) test. This is because it is easy to use and it gives fast results.

The next one is a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) test, and it’s usually used to confirm the results of the first test. This type of testing can also test for a more comprehensive array of drugs than the IA test; however, they are more expensive to purchase.

Cut Off Levels for Screening

All urine drug tests have cut-off levels. This cut-off level is the level of drug that needs to be in the system for the substance to be detected in the user’s system.

The results are shown in nanograms per milliliter: ng/ml.

It’s vital to have cut-off levels in screening because this helps against false positives. For example, if one has ingested a legal amount of hemp, coca, or opium.

In rare cases, eating a poppy seed bagel can sometimes induce a false positive for opium. Additionally, passive exposure to a drug, such as second-hand smoke, can sometimes produce false positives.

Drug Test Detection Times

There are many factors to consider when considering how long a drug stays in the user’s system; however, the longer someone uses a substance, the longer it can remain in the system. The most common factors that affect screening times are:

  • the acidity of the urine
  • weight of the patient
  • hydration levels
  • how long ago the person ingested the drug

Each drug has a length of time that it can be detected in the system. We’ll take a closer look at each one below.

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Drug Test Timeline

Every drug has a window in which you can test for its presence. Below we will take a look at the urine drug test timetable.

Amphetamines (AMP)

Also known as speed, this substance can remain for up to 2 days in the system.

Alcohol (ALC)

Alcohol stays in the system for 7–12 hours, depending on the amount consumed.

Barbiturates (BAR)

This active ingredient is found in a range of prescription pills. Also known as downers, these can be detected in the system for 2 to 15 days.

Benzodiazepines

Commonly referred to as benzos, this prescription medication can be detected within 2 to 10 days of consumption.

Cannabis (THC)

Cannabis is widely known to many as marijuana or weed. This substance can remain in the system for 3 to 30 days, depending on the frequency of use.

Cocaine (COC)

Cocaine can be detected in the system for 2 to 10 days after consumption. This also applies to crack cocaine.

Methadone (MTD)

Methadone is used to treat heroin addiction, and this prescription medication can last 2 to 7 days in the system.

Methaqualone

Known to many as Quaaludes, this prescription medication can last 10 to 15 days in the system, depending on consumption.

Opioids (OPI/MOR)

This category includes heroin, opium, codeine, and morphine, and these substances can remain in the system for 1 to 3 days.

THC Urine Drug Test

If you just need to test for the presence of THC, then there are THC drug testing strips that you can purchase. The cut-off level for THC is 50 ng/ml.

THC detection times can vary depending on the amount consumed.

10-Panel Drug Test Detection Times

The 10-panel drug tests screen for the most commonly abused prescription medications, as well as five illegal substances. They test for the following:

  1. Marijuana (THC)
  2. Buprenorphine (BUP)
  3. Oxycodone (OXY)
  4. Methamphetamine (MET)
  5. Barbiturates (BAR)
  6. Amphetamine (AMP)
  7. Cocaine (COC)
  8. Ecstasy (MDMA)
  9. Opiates (OPI/MOR)
  10. Methadone (MTD)

Once ingested, the substance remains in the system for a limited time. Additionally, urine drug test detection times can vary depending on the drug, dose, type of sample taken, and even metabolism.

These tests produce results in 3-5 minutes.

12-Panel Drug Test Detection Times

You get a few options when it comes to 12-panel drug tests. They all test for twelve common substances but also include extras like adulterants (specific gravity, -pH, and -Creatinine), Phencyclidine (PCP), and Tricyclic Antidepressants (TCA).

Results from 12-panel drug tests show within as little as 5 minutes.

Saliva Drug Test Detection Times

This test comes in a single 10-panel test and tests for the same drugs as the 10-panel urine test. The benefit of a saliva test is that it can be done quickly and without the need for a restroom.

Swab drug test detection time is as little as 10 minutes.

Administering a Drug Test

Administering a drug test is a relatively simple process. Here we will take a look at the steps required to carry out a drug test.

Drug Testing Instructions:

  1. 1. Be sure the drug test cup and urine sample are at room temperature (59-78 degrees)
  2. Label the cup carefully and accurately
  3. Once the donor provides the sample, start the timer immediately.
  4. The operator checks the cap for tightness.
  5. Remove the peel-off label.
  6. Check the temperature strip label at 4-5 minutes after specimen collection for the fresh urine specimen. Green color will appear to indicate the temperature of the urine specimen. The acceptable range for an adulterated specimen is 90-100 degrees F.
  7. The operator should only assess the results at the 5-minute mark. After 8 minutes, the test is then invalid.

Reading The Results:

The results show after a 5 minute waiting period. However, again, after 8 minutes, the test results are then invalid.

Positive

Only one colored band appears in the control area (C). No color band is seen in the test area (T).

Negative:

Two-color bands appear in both the control (C) and the test (T) area.

Invalid:

The test has failed if no bands appear in the control area (C). Discard the test and repeat with a fresh one.

Consult A Professional

Now that you know more about drug test detection times, if you feel you need to administer a test, then be sure to look at our 10-panel drug testing cups.

They’re easy to use, CLIA Waived, and FDA Approved. They’re also available in bulk quantities.